High Altitude Gear Testers Wanted!

Altitude Adapt Lozenges

I’ll bet that many of you have read my gear reviews and thought “heck, I could do that if I was given free gear” or “how hard could that be?” Well continue reading to find out how five lucky readers can get the opportunity to score some free gear samples and write a review of the product on Brian’s Backpacking Blog.

I was recently approached by Altitude Adapt, makers of lozenges that help alleviate the symptoms of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) or altitude sickness as it’s more commonly know. They reached out to me because of my blog post from last year in which I described my own experience with AMS during my ascent of Mt. Whitney. This year I was able to successfully summit Mt. Whitney with no symptoms of AMS thanks to several factors (more on this in a future post). I did not take Altitude Adapt with me this year because the company reached out to me after I had already returned from my trip.

Altitude Adapt Lozenges

About Altitude Adapt
Altitude Adapt is a fast acting lozenge that helps your body more efficiently deliver and utilize oxygen. It is believed that the main cause of altitude sickness is insufficient oxygen absorption and circulation. The lozenges are an all-natural supplement that work within minutes and last for hours, without caffeine or other stimulants.

I would love to be able to test these lozenges for myself to evaluate how well they work but there is one small problem – I don’t have any trips planned for the rest of the year that would take me to an elevation where I can effectively test them. This is where you come in.

Altitude Adapt Lozenges

Product Reviewers Wanted
Instead of having me test this product on my own, and because I won’t have an opportunity to do so at any significant elevation, I suggested to Altitude Adapt that they sponsor five readers from my blog who would be willing to carefully test these lozenges and write up their findings (good or bad) to be published on my blog. They were immediately onboard with the idea and can’t wait to get their product out for review.

In order to qualify to become a reviewer you need to satisfy the minimum prerequisites listed below. These are to ensure that you will be able to properly test the lozenges in the right environment and follow up with constructive feedback.

Altitude Adapt Lozenges

Prerequisites for Reviewers:

  • You will need to have a trip planned that will take you above 8,000 ft in the coming months
  • Ideally you should have some prior experience with symptoms of AMS on previous hikes at altitude, no point testing if you’ve never suffered with the problem
  • Be willing to provide your home shipping address so that Altitude Adapt can send you samples of the product (do NOT post your address here!)
  • Carefully document your experience of using Altitude Adapt including at least one photograph of you and the product on location – more photos a bonus!
  • Be willing to write up your findings in the form of a short blog review that will be posted here
  • Reviews can be positive or negative, but must be constructive and accurate

How to Enter
If you think you would be willing to test and review Altitude Adapt and you meet the prerequisites listed above, then please leave a brief comment below describing when and where you intend to test the product and what your previous experience was with symptoms of AMS. Remember: Do not leave your home address in the comments, I will follow up privately with the winners to get that information.

On October 10th (two weeks) we will pick the five best suited entrants to receive samples of the Altitude Adapt lozenges for review. We will reach out to the five winners to provide them with additional information about testing.

I’m trying something very new here to see what type of response I get back from you. If this works, I might use the same approach to solicit your help in reviewing other backpacking gear in the future – everyone likes free gear right? Good luck and I look forward to reading your responses :)

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  • http://twitter.com/JillianLaura Jillian Bejtlich

    I think I have the perfect test for this, as long as you and Altitude Alps don’t mind waiting until late January/early February. Last year I went out to Heavenly in South Lake Tahoe for my first ever West coast snowboard trip. The summit is at just over 10000 ft, and I had never (not even once) been at that elevation. The moment I jumped off that chairlift and started trying to move around… eek. My muscles just refused to work as intended at that elevation. I almost instantly crashed into snowbanks, hugged a few trees, and had some great wipeouts (I swear I’m better at lower elevations). I was instantly exhausted, felt like hell, and needless to say, we called it quits way too early that day. If there’s someway low elevation dwellers can ride hard at high elevations without the crazy adjustment period, I’m game!

    What can I say? I live 127 ft above sea level…

  • http://twitter.com/JillianLaura Jillian Bejtlich

    I think I have the perfect test for this, as long as you and Altitude Alps don’t mind waiting until late January/early February. Last year I went out to Heavenly in South Lake Tahoe for my first ever West coast snowboard trip. The summit is at just over 10000 ft, and I had never (not even once) been at that elevation. The moment I jumped off that chairlift and started trying to move around… eek. My muscles just refused to work as intended at that elevation. I almost instantly crashed into snowbanks, hugged a few trees, and had some great wipeouts (I swear I’m better at lower elevations). I was instantly exhausted, felt like hell, and needless to say, we called it quits way too early that day. If there’s someway low elevation dwellers can ride hard at high elevations without the crazy adjustment period, I’m game!

    What can I say? I live 127 ft above sea level…

  • http://twitter.com/SteveWWeiss Steve W. Weiss

    I go snowboarding everyday here in Utah and plan on doing backcountry splitboarding all year. I will mainly stay above 8ft and drop under and climb back up, to do loops/runs. I am aware of AMS since I came to Utah from Ohio, and know how much it can suck. Let me know if you are interested in a splitboarder and I will gladly test it out. You can see writing samples at http://www.mountainenthusiast.com.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I hope you mean 8,000ft! I don’t see why you being a splitboarder would disqualify you. Fine with me.

  • http://twitter.com/SteveWWeiss Steve W. Weiss

    I go snowboarding everyday here in Utah and plan on doing backcountry splitboarding all year. I will mainly stay above 8ft and drop under and climb back up, to do loops/runs. I am aware of AMS since I came to Utah from Ohio, and know how much it can suck. Let me know if you are interested in a splitboarder and I will gladly test it out. You can see writing samples at http://www.mountainenthusiast.com.

  • Ron

    I live at sea level. I can be in the control group.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Are you planning a high elevation hike anytime soon and have you suffered with symptoms of AMS in the past?

  • Ron

    I live at sea level. I can be in the control group.

  • Julia K

    I live at sea level and am hiking Whitney next week. My permit is for Oct 7-8, so the time frame is short!

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Shoot – that’s going to be too soon based on our cut-off date. Have you suffered with any symptoms of AMS on previous high elevation hikes?

  • Julia K

    I live at sea level and am hiking Whitney next week. My permit is for Oct 7-8, so the time frame is short!

  • Dr. Jim

    I’ve been an avid ultralight backpacker for over 20 years and I’m also a gear-head. Every year, I do a 14,000 foot peak. This year was Mt. Langley in California. I frequently go to Mt. Baldy (10,000 foot peak in southern California). Past experience – I’ve experienced altitude sickness last year: Headache and loss of balance, with extreme exhaustion. After descending 1000 feet, it was much improved. I’ve used Ginkgo on many trips and it works very well but didn’t have it on this trip. My proposed trip would be to Mt. Baldy: 6 miles one way, with 4300 feet elevation gain. I can stay overnight or more than that if need be. I’m a Chiropractic doctor and a clinical nutritionist.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      You sound like a great candidate Jim, thanks for volunteering!

  • Dr. Jim

    I’ve been an avid ultralight backpacker for over 20 years and I’m also a gear-head. Every year, I do a 14,000 foot peak. This year was Mt. Langley in California. I frequently go to Mt. Baldy (10,000 foot peak in southern California). Past experience – I’ve experienced altitude sickness last year: Headache and loss of balance, with extreme exhaustion. After descending 1000 feet, it was much improved. I’ve used Ginkgo on many trips and it works very well but didn’t have it on this trip. My proposed trip would be to Mt. Baldy: 6 miles one way, with 4300 feet elevation gain. I can stay overnight or more than that if need be. I’m a Chiropractic doctor and a clinical nutritionist.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Shoot – that’s going to be too soon based on our cut-off date. Have you suffered with any symptoms of AMS on previous high elevation hikes?

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Are you planning a high elevation hike anytime soon and have you suffered with symptoms of AMS in the past?

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    I hope you mean 8,000ft! I don’t see why you being a splitboarder would disqualify you. Fine with me.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    You sound like a great candidate Jim, thanks for volunteering!

  • WPC

    I have
    the perfect test for this product. I
    live in the flatlands of the Midwest and will be traveling with my wife to Peru
    before the end of the year. We have not
    been to these elevations for a few years, but will spend four days hiking the Inca
    Trail before arriving at Machu Picchu.
    During the hike, we’ll experience elevations over 13,000 feet. We’ll be at elevation consistently for several
    days on the trail and while in other parts of the country, we’ll regularly be
    over 12,000 feet. We’re active backpackers and have done some climbing, but we’ve not experienced
    altitude like this for a long time period.

    This
    will give a perspective on how the product could work over a sustained period
    of time at elevation.

  • WPC

    I have
    the perfect test for this product. I
    live in the flatlands of the Midwest and will be traveling with my wife to Peru
    before the end of the year. We have not
    been to these elevations for a few years, but will spend four days hiking the Inca
    Trail before arriving at Machu Picchu.
    During the hike, we’ll experience elevations over 13,000 feet. We’ll be at elevation consistently for several
    days on the trail and while in other parts of the country, we’ll regularly be
    over 12,000 feet. We’re active backpackers and have done some climbing, but we’ve not experienced
    altitude like this for a long time period.

    This
    will give a perspective on how the product could work over a sustained period
    of time at elevation.

  • http://www.facebook.com/michelle.pearson3 Michelle Pearson

    I just completed Pikes Peak this past Saturday. This was my first high altitude hike. I was shocked at how slow I had to go because of the headaches, dizziness, and waves of nausea! Took my totally by surprise. Started at Crags about 9800 and finished at Devils Playground at 12,811 because I was too slow to complete the summit before time to head down. Down was awesome! Training proved itself there… when I could breathe! So only negative was the symptoms. Drunken dizzy lasted 3 days. I am scheduled for Mt Kilimanjaro, leaving January 2, 2013, so I need to squeeze in another trip to Pikes or similar before year end. Totally into nutrition so would love to test these before Kili – and use them instead of Diamox if possible since not hyped about the hallucinations it can cause! Interesting that your blog got to me today, just after that experience!

    • http://www.facebook.com/michelle.pearson3 Michelle Pearson

      sorry make that 13080 for the top there. anyway, higher than Arkansas and Missouri.

  • http://www.facebook.com/michelle.pearson3 Michelle Pearson

    I just completed Pikes Peak this past Saturday. This was my first high altitude hike. I was shocked at how slow I had to go because of the headaches, dizziness, and waves of nausea! Took my totally by surprise. Started at Crags about 9800 and finished at Devils Playground at 12,811 because I was too slow to complete the summit before time to head down. Down was awesome! Training proved itself there… when I could breathe! So only negative was the symptoms. Drunken dizzy lasted 3 days. I am scheduled for Mt Kilimanjaro, leaving January 2, 2013, so I need to squeeze in another trip to Pikes or similar before year end. Totally into nutrition so would love to test these before Kili – and use them instead of Diamox if possible since not hyped about the hallucinations it can cause! Interesting that your blog got to me today, just after that experience!

  • Daniel Yates

    I might be a candidate. Im a 55 year old fat flatlander that will be hiking as high as we can during the Thanksgiving break in Colorado. Snow will possibly set us back, but if we can do a 14teener we will, we did Elbert last year. 14,433ft. We usually camp around 9 to 10 and summit from there. From previous experience with AS, I feel it is a real function of hydration and fitness. This product might be a boon to guys like me that are a few pounds over but still like to hike. Happy to do it. BTW I stumbled on your site, and love it, just bought a large cache of ProBars and they are great.
    Dan

  • Daniel Yates

    I might be a candidate. Im a 55 year old fat flatlander that will be hiking as high as we can during the Thanksgiving break in Colorado. Snow will possibly set us back, but if we can do a 14teener we will, we did Elbert last year. 14,433ft. We usually camp around 9 to 10 and summit from there. From previous experience with AS, I feel it is a real function of hydration and fitness. This product might be a boon to guys like me that are a few pounds over but still like to hike. Happy to do it. BTW I stumbled on your site, and love it, just bought a large cache of ProBars and they are great.
    Dan

  • http://twitter.com/vortex33 Vortex33

    Those would have come in handy in July! I’ll be interested in the results since we go from close to 600 feet in Chicago to Yosemite/Rockies/Grand Canyon in the summer. We’ve both suffered with altitude sickness and always add acclimation days to the beginning of our trip.

  • superslowmo

    While I live close to sea level, every weekend (work permitting) I try to climb one of Mt. Baldy (10k ft), Mt. San Jacinto (10.8k ft) or Mt. San Gorgonio (11.5k ft). Fortunately I haven’t experienced much AMS other than occasional headaches and dizziness (after which I immediately turn around and head down). I’m heading to Peru next month but I don’t know exactly what I’m going to visit (other than Machu Picchu). I may not be the best candidate as I may be more “altitude adapted” now and may not be able to manifest symptoms in a predictable way. I’ve never used any drugs or supplements for AMS.

  • Jeremy

    Hello Brian, my name is Jeremy. I’m 30 years old and I would love to test this product. I am an avid ultralight backpacker and I have had two of my last three trips ruined by AMS. You can read about one of them (and get a sample of my writing) here http://klymitblog.wordpress.com/2012/07/05/worst-night-in-the-woods-winner/. I currently have multiple trips planned at altitude. Two in my own backyard in Mt. San Bernardino (10+k) and Mt. San Gorgonio (11+k) and one in Yosemite this fall. Almost all of my trips are at altitude and I would (selfishly) love to see if this would help me. I would also love to give something back to the ultralight backpacking community that has taught me so much. Thanks for your consideration.

    God Bless, Jeremy

  • http://www.facebook.com/kathyjohnsonhoffman Kathy Hoffman

    Too bad I just missed the cutoff date (out of town). I too, had to turn around on Whitney due to altitude sickness, which I have struggled with in the past. I have 3 trips to altitude about 9,000 feet, planned in the next 6 months, so if you ever need anyone to test in the future, please let me know.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Depending on how it goes this round, we might be planning to do this again. So stay tuned :)

  • Patrick

    I hope they are not too expensive?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      The 12-pack shown costs $25 (via the website link above) and will last for an entire trip. To me that’s a small price to pay if it works and alleviates AMS.

  • Patrick

    Good luck on the tests everybody. It is for the greater good. I am happy to see all the volunteers willing to get things done for the future of high altitude studies.