Amazingly Good Paleo Beef Jerky Recipe

Amazingly good paleo beef jerky recipe

I just made my first batch of Paleo beef jerky and the results are so good that I thought I’d share it with you. My entire house smells of beef jerky right now and it’s driving my dog crazy – poor thing.

What’s Paleo?

I’m not going to go into the details, but simply put it’s a way of eating that best mimics the diets of our paleolithic hunter-gatherer ancestors – lean meats, seafood, vegetables, fruits, and nuts. If you’re interested take a look here: The Paleo Diet.

I’ve been gradually getting more and more serious about eating a paleo diet as a lifestyle and wanted to see if I could find a recipe that I could use for making beef jerky that would be suitable = no soy sauce, besides other things. I was sent two really good examples of paleo jerky recipes from @paleoonabudget via Twitter (love how social tools connect us) and thought that they both sounded good enough to try. Here they are: Food Lover’s Kitchen Beef Jerky, and Jen’s Gone Paleo Really Tasty Beef Jerky.

My Version

Always one to tinker and hack with something, I adjusted and combined aspects from both recipes to come up with one that sounded good to me. Here’s what I ended up with:

  • Flank steak as lean as possible (grass-fed), trim any excess fat
  • 1 cup raw coconut aminos (it’s a substitute for soy sauce)
  • 1 cup of organic apple juice (make sure there are no additives)
  • 1 cup of pineapple juice (again, no additives)
  • 1 tbsp fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp of paprika
  • 1 tsp of garlic powder
  • Lime juice (not in the marinade)

Amazingly good paleo beef jerky recipe

I used a nice cut of flank steak (personal preference) and made sure to trim off all excess fat, although there was hardly any. I put the steak in the freezer for an hour or two to make slicing it into thin strips a little easier.

Then I put all of the other ingredients (the marinade) into a Pyrex dish and added the sliced steak pieces, making sure that all of the steak was covered or submerged. I think I topped up with a little extra of both juices. I covered this and put it in the fridge overnight.

Amazingly good paleo beef jerky recipe

Dehydrating – Making it Jerky!

The next day (around noon) I removed the marinading steak from the fridge and let it drain through a small sieve for a minute or two to get the excess liquid off. No need to get my dehydrator into a big mess if I can easily avoid it. I used my old faithful L’Equip 528 6-tray Dehydrator (see previous post here). Love this machine!

I gave the entire batch of steak a heavy dose of freshly squeezed lime juice, all over. I was very heavy handed with the lime (thinking this would be my “secret sauce”). Then I arranged the pieces of steak onto the drying sheets (mine has six) making sure to leave a lot of room around each piece.

Amazingly good paleo beef jerky recipe

I set the temperature gauge to half way between 125F and 153F (~135F) and turned it on. At this point I went out to take care of some errands – nothing you would be interested in. When I got back a few hours later, I was greeted by the smell of beef jerky as I opened the front door – wow!

The jerky had been drying for about four hours while I was gone and much to my surprise was completely done. In fact it could have come out a little bit sooner to be even better, but that’s my fault for going away and leaving it. When I make jerky using ground beef it takes a lot, lot, longer – more than twice as long.

Amazingly good paleo beef jerky recipe

The end result is absolutely delicious. The combination of the fruit juices, coconut aminos and spices gives the steak an amazing, slightly citrus flavor. I wish you could try some, it’s soooo good!

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  • http://twitter.com/Maoomba Stormy Sweitzer

    Beautiful! I’ve been thinking about making jerky – wondering about the dehydrator – and ran across your recipe on twitter tonight. Perfect timing. This sounds really good – Thank you!

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Cool – let me know how it goes for you and if you adjust anything. Next time I want to get a little more adventurous with the flavors :)

      • http://twitter.com/Maoomba Stormy Sweitzer

        Just pulled it out of the dehydrator this morning – it marinated for 2 days before I had a chance to pop it in. Turned out really well. I think I’ll add more garlic and pepper next time, but otherwise think it’s delicious! Thanks for the inspiration!

        • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

          Thanks for being the only person brave enough to try it. BTW I saw you blog post and photos – your jerky looks way better than mine and I don’t think it’s just the gorgeous photos. Do you mind if I add a link to your site at the bottom of my blog post?

  • http://twitter.com/Maoomba Stormy Sweitzer

    Beautiful! I’ve been thinking about making jerky – wondering about the dehydrator – and ran across your recipe on twitter tonight. Perfect timing. This sounds really good – Thank you!

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Cool – let me know how it goes for you and if you adjust anything. Next time I want to get a little more adventurous with the flavors :)

  • Joe

    I’m Paleo and I make my own jerky with a recipe I found from food network. It is heavenly. I use Gluten free Soy Sauce.It’s readily available. It works great. Realize that Gluten isn’t in soy, it is in the wheat flower that most soy sauce has added to it as a filler. Bad Shit.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Joe, that sounds interesting. Was it the Alton Brown beef jerky recipe by any chance?

  • Joe

    I’m Paleo and I make my own jerky with a recipe I found from food network. It is heavenly. I use Gluten free Soy Sauce.It’s readily available. It works great. Realize that Gluten isn’t in soy, it is in the wheat flower that most soy sauce has added to it as a filler. Bad Shit.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Joe, that sounds interesting. Was it the Alton Brown beef jerky recipe by any chance?

  • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

    Next time I have to remember to slice the meat with the grain, ugg.

    • http://twitter.com/DavidECreech Wilderness Dave

      Why with the grain? I thought you were supposed to slice against the grain to shorten the muscle fibers making it easier to bite and chew?

      • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

        That’s what I thought (and did) too Dave. Apparently for jerky it works better the other way. It’s worth a try, I’ll let you know if there is a noticeable difference.

        • Jess Mink

          I always slice against the grain. Lets me get thinner pieces and makes it easier to chew. The bits I’ve accidentally made with the grain were certainly a bit more of an adventure to eat.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Next time I have to remember to slice the meat with the grain, ugg.

  • KarenGuttridge

    That looks sooo good. But – I’ve never had beef jerky (poor ol’ Brit…). Is the consistency crunchy or chewy?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I’m an ex-Brit and even I’ve had jerky before! The texture is supposed to be firm but chewy. You don’t want it to be so hard that you can’t chew on it or that you break your teeth.

      The best way I can describe the right texture would be to compare it to properly cooked bacon. Not too crispy and not all flopping around – firm but chewy :)

  • karenguttridge

    That looks sooo good. But – I’ve never had beef jerky (poor ol’ Brit…). Is the consistency crunchy or chewy?

  • Loneoak

    I will provide my address, if you want me to try some :) Sounds great

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      :)

  • Loneoak

    I will provide my address, if you want me to try some :) Sounds great

  • twency

    I don’t see a cooking step (other than the low drying heat of the dehydrator). Is the meat sufficiently cured by other ingredients and/or the heat from the dehydrator to destroy any food-borne pathogens?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Food borne pathogens? You mean like botulism? I assume that four hours of drying at a medium heat is sufficient to handle that, or the marinading over night in the salty mix would do the trick?

      To be honest I don’t know, I’m not a food expert. I will say that I’ve been making jerky using lots of different recipes over the years and have never (knowingly) gotten ill from any pathogens.

      I defer to the experts among us to chime in here, I know that curing salt is used in a lot of jerky recipes but I didn’t use it on this as you can see. Anyone have any thoughts – but for the record I’m keeping the recipe the same unless I hear something drastic.

      • twency

        I was thinking more along the lines of E. coli or salmonella, but yeah, botulism too. The salty marinade and drying might be enough render the meat safe if it’s contaminated, I really don’t know. Just curious.

        • Happy Haxor

          It isn’t. You can’t kill C. Botulinum effectively without nitrates or temperatures only reachable under pressure (higher than boiling). This is why pressure canners and curing salts exist.

          That said, your changes are low since this isn’t ground meat and C. Botulinum grows best (and produces toxins in) damp low oxygen environments. The surface area of steak really doesn’t constitute either, sliced or otherwise.

          Not saying it can’t happen, but it’s highly unlikely. If you’re concerned however, then by all means cure the meat first.

  • twency

    I don’t see a cooking step (other than the low drying heat of the dehydrator). Is the meat sufficiently cured by other ingredients and/or the heat from the dehydrator to destroy any food-borne pathogens?

  • Catharine

    Yay! I was so happy to see you have a Paleo recipe. I am an ultralight backpacker who is also a Primal/Paleo eater. It would be great to get more recipes appropriate for paleo backpackers. Beef Jerky is one of the best. I’ve also dried cooked ground beef for use in recipes such as chili. I would just like to eat something other than beef jerky, powdered eggs, nuts and cheese. : )

    Catharine

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I was thinking the same thing earlier today about Paleo food for backpackers. As if we’re not a small enough niche already, lets narrow it down to ultralight backpackers who eat Paleo :)

      I’m willing to share the occasional Paleo recipe on my blog as it makes sense, but doubt it will be that often. This morning I made Paleo pancakes from scratch and they were delicious, but not something you can take on the trail – that’s going to be the kicker. Let me know if you want the pancake recipe.

      I’ll be on the look out for Paleo backpacking ideas and will share them when I find them – will you promise to do the same? Do you do CrossFit too?

  • Catharine

    Yay! I was so happy to see you have a Paleo recipe. I am an ultralight backpacker who is also a Primal/Paleo eater. It would be great to get more recipes appropriate for paleo backpackers. Beef Jerky is one of the best. I’ve also dried cooked ground beef for use in recipes such as chili. I would just like to eat something other than beef jerky, powdered eggs, nuts and cheese. : )

    Catharine

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    I’m an ex-Brit and even I’ve had jerky before! The texture is supposed to be firm but chewy. You don’t want it to be so hard that you can’t chew on it or that you break your teeth.

    The best way I can describe the right texture would be to compare it to properly cooked bacon. Not too crispy and not all flopping around – firm but chewy :)

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    :)

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Food borne pathogens? You mean like botulism? I assume that four hours of drying at a medium heat is sufficient to handle that, or the marinading over night in the salty mix would do the trick?

    To be honest I don’t know, I’m not a food expert. I will say that I’ve been making jerky using lots of different recipes over the years and have never (knowingly) gotten ill from any pathogens.

    I defer to the experts among us to chime in here, I know that curing salt is used in a lot of jerky recipes but I didn’t use it on this as you can see. Anyone have any thoughts – but for the record I’m keeping the recipe the same unless I hear something drastic.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    I was thinking the same thing earlier today about Paleo food for backpackers. As if we’re not a small enough niche already, lets narrow it down to ultralight backpackers who eat Paleo :)

    I’m willing to share the occasional Paleo recipe on my blog as it makes sense, but doubt it will be that often. This morning I made Paleo pancakes from scratch and they were delicious, but not something you can take on the trail – that’s going to be the kicker. Let me know if you want the pancake recipe.

    I’ll be on the look out for Paleo backpacking ideas and will share them when I find them – will you promise to do the same? Do you do CrossFit too?

  • twency

    I was thinking more along the lines of E. coli or salmonella, but yeah, botulism too. The salty marinade and drying might be enough render the meat safe if it’s contaminated, I really don’t know. Just curious.

  • camper trailers perth

    Wow! This is indeed very yummy.

  • camper trailers perth

    Wow! This is indeed very yummy.
    http://www.mycampertrailer.com.au/

  • http://twitter.com/DavidECreech Wilderness Dave

    Why with the grain? I thought you were supposed to slice against the grain to shorten the muscle fibers making it easier to bite and chew?

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    That’s what I thought (and did) too Dave. Apparently for jerky it works better the other way. It’s worth a try, I’ll let you know if there is a noticeable difference.

  • Ultra_Magnus

    I’ve always had issues with commercial dehydrators. I mean, jerky is supposed to be dried meat- yet 140F is cooking it to a good medium done-ness. The preservation is supposed to be taken care of by the high salt content and the lack of moisture.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/beef-jerky-recipe/index.html

    I don’t know how many of you are Good Eats fans but in the episode where Alton Brown makes that recipe he demonstrates how to use a normal house fan to dry the beef. It may not work for those of you who live in humid climates but here in the desert it’s a whopping 11% right now. When I give making my own jerky a try, that’s the method I’m going to go with.

    found video (part two of the episode) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfI0NKl-Kq0&feature=relmfu

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Thanks for sharing Alton’s videos. I’ll admit to being a big fan of Alton Brown and Good Eats.

      So what’s the bottom line? Is my recipe no good because it doesn’t have enough salt (curing slat) in it? I’ve found lots of recipes for making jerky online and not all of them have a lot of salt in them.

      My jerky tastes fantastic, and has a good consistency that is not too tough. Am I going to get sick from the bacteria in the meat, if so I have to tell you it’s a bit too late for that now.

      • Ultra_Magnus

        Oh no- I have absolutely nothing to say against your recipe. Honestly, I didn’t even compare your to Alton Brown’s for salt content or anything. I was only pointing out the difference between commercial dehydrators that “cook” while they dry, as compared to just drying without cooking.

        And in the end, the finished product is really all that matters.

        I guess it just really comes down to a personal gripe that I have- I mean, primitive man had been making jerky for thousands of years without a food dehydrator, but now “the man” is telling me I need an expensive and bulky piece of equipment in my kitchen to do the same. When I was a kid, my friend’s mom made fruit leather by spreading out some jam (don’t know what preparations she did to it) on a plastic lined cookie sheet, and set it out in the back yard on a warm day, covered with some window screen to keep the flies and other bugs off of it.

        Anyway- that’s my $0.02

        • Ms Meat Inspector

          I dry my jerky in my oven of my stove. I start it with the door closed to keep the moisture in and take the temperature over 160 degrees to kill pathogens, then drop the temperature and open the door. The main thing is to control “available water” or the water that is available for the bacteria to use to live and replicate. As long as it the water molecules that remain are tied up in the meat molecules themselves, you are okay. (chopped beef jerky is a greater concern than whole muscle jerky). The purpose of the salt is to help tie up available water. Also be careful of contaminating the jerky with listeria after it is dried.

  • Ultra_Magnus

    I’ve always had issues with commercial dehydrators. I mean, jerky is supposed to be dried meat- yet 140F is cooking it to a good medium done-ness. The preservation is supposed to be taken care of by the high salt content and the lack of moisture.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/beef-jerky-recipe/index.html

    I don’t know how many of you are Good Eats fans but in the episode where Alton Brown makes that recipe he demonstrates how to use a normal house fan to dry the beef. It may not work for those of you who live in humid climates but here in the desert it’s a whopping 11% right now. When I give making my own jerky a try, that’s the method I’m going to go with.

    found video (part two of the episode) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfI0NKl-Kq0&feature=relmfu

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Thanks for sharing Alton’s videos. I’ll admit to being a big fan of Alton Brown and Good Eats.

    So what’s the bottom line? Is my recipe no good because it doesn’t have enough salt (curing slat) in it? I’ve found lots of recipes for making jerky online and not all of them have a lot of salt in them.

    My jerky tastes fantastic, and has a good consistency that is not too tough. Am I going to get sick from the bacteria in the meat, if so I have to tell you it’s a bit too late for that now.

  • http://twitter.com/Maoomba Stormy Sweitzer

    Just pulled it out of the dehydrator this morning – it marinated for 2 days before I had a chance to pop it in. Turned out really well. I think I’ll add more garlic and pepper next time, but otherwise think it’s delicious! Thanks for the inspiration!

  • http://www.beefjerkyninjas.com/ Cheap Beef Jerky

    In my opinion the dehydrator is superior to any other method,much faster, moist jerkyand you can do alot more at a time .i also suggest meat in brine or rub for only a few hours .i prefer dryer as opposed to moister .jerky stores better and longer when dry.smoke flavoring is all chemical and not needed. Cheers, @Linda:)

  • linda99

    In my oppinion the dehydrator is superior to any other method,much faster,
    moist jerkyand you can do alot more at a time .i also suggest meat in brine or
    rub for only a few hours .i prefer dryer as opposed to moister .jerky stores
    better and longer when dry.smoke flavoring is all chemical and not needed. Cheers, @Linda:)

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Thanks for being the only person brave enough to try it. BTW I saw you blog post and photos – your jerky looks way better than mine and I don’t think it’s just the gorgeous photos. Do you mind if I add a link to your site at the bottom of my blog post?

  • Ultra_Magnus

    Oh no- I have absolutely nothing to say against your recipe. Honestly, I didn’t even compare your to Alton Brown’s for salt content or anything. I was only pointing out the difference between commercial dehydrators that “cook” while they dry, as compared to just drying without cooking.

    And in the end, the finished product is really all that matters.

    I guess it just really comes down to a personal gripe that I have- I mean, primitive man had been making jerky for thousands of years without a food dehydrator, but now “the man” is telling me I need an expensive and bulky piece of equipment in my kitchen to do the same. When I was a kid, my friend’s mom made fruit leather by spreading out some jam (don’t know what preparations she did to it) on a plastic lined cookie sheet, and set it out in the back yard on a warm day, covered with some window screen to keep the flies and other bugs off of it.

    Anyway- that’s my $0.02

  • Jess Mink

    I always slice against the grain. Lets me get thinner pieces and makes it easier to chew. The bits I’ve accidentally made with the grain were certainly a bit more of an adventure to eat.

  • Jess Mink

    Hrm, I haven’t tried a soaking marinade yet – still getting used to beef. For sheep jerky I love it with just a little salt and pepper.

    For the actual dehydrating I’ve had great success just hanging it up in the backyard over a string. I live in California near San Francisco, so your millage may vary if you’re trying this in Nebraska in February. :)

    In terms of consistency I like it dry enough that it snaps when you bend it. It makes it lighter, means it’ll keep longer, and also means you can powder it for use in stews, penician, etc. I’m really looking forward to trying goat jerky. I think that’ll be great.

  • Jess Mink

    Hrm, I haven’t tried a soaking marinade yet – still getting used to beef. For sheep jerky I love it with just a little salt and pepper.

    For the actual dehydrating I’ve had great success just hanging it up in the backyard over a string. I live in California near San Francisco, so your millage may vary if you’re trying this in Nebraska in February. :)

    In terms of consistency I like it dry enough that it snaps when you bend it. It makes it lighter, means it’ll keep longer, and also means you can powder it for use in stews, penician, etc. I’m really looking forward to trying goat jerky. I think that’ll be great.

  • Jess Mink

    Okay, I give up. I was going to ignore it, but it’s driving me crazy. Why isn’t soy sauce paleo?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Start by Googling “soy not paleo” and read some of the results. Here’s a quote from one: “The main reason why you should avoid soy are the same reasons why you should stay away from other grains and legumes. Lectins will mess with your leptin sensitivity (hunger and energy expenditure signals), making your brain think he’s hungry even when your body has more than enough calories. Leptin resistance could lead to insulin resistance, which could lead to a host of problems also known as the metabolic syndrome. Levels of phytates in soy are also very high. Phytates bind to minerals like zinc, calcium, iron and magnesium and make them unavailable for you.”

      • Mike B

        Most Soy Sauce also contains wheat, bring your own replacement if you go out for Sushi.

  • Jess Mink

    Okay, I give up. I was going to ignore it, but it’s driving me crazy. Why isn’t soy sauce paleo?

  • Diane

    Try it with beef heart sometime. There’s a good beef heart jerky recipe on Mark’s Daily Apple. Heart is good because it has so little fat.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      That I am going to have to look into. I’m a big fan of Mark’s Daily Apple :)

  • Diane

    Try it with beef heart sometime. There’s a good beef heart jerky recipe on Mark’s Daily Apple. Heart is good because it has so little fat.

  • Rich

    Which dehydrator is that you are using there? I looked in all the comments and could not find any clue. Thanks!

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Rich, the dehydrator I have is called the L’Equip 528 Dehydrator and can be bought online in many places. I got mine via Amazon for a reasonable price. It came with 6 trays and has been used for all sorts of fun drying projects. It probably gets the most use for making jerky which can be expensive to buy.

  • Rich

    Which dehydrator is that you are using there? I looked in all the comments and could not find any clue. Thanks!

  • http://twitter.com/owljones Owl Jones

    I’m having a hard time wrapping my tiny brain around this. So, people think it’s beneficial to eat like cave men, but the recipe has “apple juice” and “amino” something or others? I love jerky though, and often wonder as fast as we consume stuff these days why we need all those preservatives in our food. I wonder if a cave dude invented the toothpick? hmmm…

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Caveman and primal is a bit of a misnomer. I don’t know that cavemen could produce some of the products used in paleo recipes, but the concept is 100% sound: Lean meats, vegetables, and fruits – simple, real food.

      Apples are natural, coconut aminos is derived from coconut tree sap and is a abundant source of natural amino acids – the building block of proteins. Soy-based sauces are not good for you, in fact I’d go so far as to say they are very, very bad for you. So this combination of fruit juices and aminos is a great substitute for a natural acid mix.

      And yes, a lot of people not only believe but have seen the benefits of eating the way we are genetically built to. I don’t understand why that is so hard to believe. I’m not going to argue the point of a balanced diet and exercise – do the research and see for yourself. I can tell you that I made the switch and will never turn back. I’ve dropped thirty pounds, gained muscle (strength and endurance) and have reduced my body fat percentage to 14% = I’m in better shape now at over 40 than I was in college.

      You’re right about the preservatives, we don’t need them. This jerky recipe is all natural and creates jerky that can be stored for a very long time. Tasty and good for you, that’s the goal right?

  • http://twitter.com/owljones Owl Jones

    I’m having a hard time wrapping my tiny brain around this. So, people think it’s beneficial to eat like cave men, but the recipe has “apple juice” and “amino” something or others? I love jerky though, and often wonder as fast as we consume stuff these days why we need all those preservatives in our food. I wonder if a cave dude invented the toothpick? hmmm…

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/TO75T24IZG6Y4PBOED54L35STQ gus

    It seems to me that dehydrator is a must-have. My wife insists on buying it but I was always skeptical, like, what the hell do we need that dehydrator for? Now I see what for :) Thanks for the recipe. – Gus.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/TO75T24IZG6Y4PBOED54L35STQ gus

    It seems to me that dehydrator is a must-have. My wife insists on buying it but I was always skeptical, like, what the hell do we need that dehydrator for? Now I see what for:) thanks for the recipe.

    Gus, scrabble rules

  • markswalkingblog

    Brian, I have been catching up on blogs. I see you are on a Paleo diet. What is your main reason for this? I have been on a near Paleo diet for three years, it has really helped me with the gastric reflux I had. It seems that eating starch and protein was really bad for me and in a few days it disappeared and very rarely comes back. I have a leaner fitter body shape and combined with PT training down the gym on a regular basis and my hiking I feel better than I have for years. BTW good recipe.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      It all started with the GORUCK Challenge. I signed up for it knowing that it would totally kick my ass if I didn’t get in shape and used it as a goal to get fit. I had been eating beter and working out for several months until I ran into a neighbor at a birthday party and mentioned the GORUCK Challenge and my workout schedule to him.

      Right off the bat he asked about my diet and details of my daily regime – quickly summarizing that I was not doing enough heavy lifting or cross training to be ready for GORUCK. He owns a local Crossfit Box (gym) and the very next day I showed up to check it out. The paleo diet change happen that week and has been the norm for me ever since – I don’t miss bread or pasta any more!

      Well fast forward 6 months, and I’ve successfully completed GORUCK Challenge, summited Mt. Whitney, dropped 30lbs, increased my muscle mass and reduced my overall body fat to 14%. I’m in better shape now than I have been in a very long time. I didn’t have any medical reasons for changing my diet, it just went hand in hand with the Crossfit mentality and has proven successful with me and many of my WOD colleagues.

      My current goal is to be 100% paleo, 80% of the time :)

  • DD Longlegs

    I think I will give this a try with moose meat and/or elk. Just have to wait for the blizzard to stop and the plows to catch up so I can go to town to get the aminos. Will let you know how it turns out.

  • Mary S.

    I just made this recipe and it worked brilliantly! It’s not salty but the meat is nice and chewy with a slight fruity flavour. I needed something without all the sugar! Thank you!

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Thanks Mary! I love this recipe too and it’s easy to make. It has all the flavor without all the salt and sugar. Enjoy.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Did you follow it exactly, or did you change the recipe?

  • http://twitter.com/AdventureStrong Adventure Strong

    That sounds really good. Where did you get the coconut aminos? I’ve never seen those before. I think I’d add some Sriracha sauce to the marinade for a spicy kick.

  • JJ_Mathes

    Brian- about how many pounds of steak did you start with for the amount of ingredients listed? You may have mentioned this and I may be over looking it.

    • TiffanyinTexas

      One of his recipes that he used as a base used 3 pounds of Lean Flank Steak.

  • Joe

    I used to use my version of the Alton Brown recipe but in the dehydrator. However to share my jerky with the people at my crossfit it’s better to be totally paleo and soy free, so I tweaked yours a little and it came out awesome. I use local grass fed top round which has no fat and I can get big slices. I used 2/3 cup coconut aminos, 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar, half an apple, a cup of fresh pineapple, 1/2 cup of onion, 2 garlic cloves, and because I like it hot, 4 habaneros. Liquefied all that in a blender then marinated for about four hours and dried in my dehydrator. Thanks for posting, I think this is my new standard recipe.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Yeah! Sounds like you kicked it up a few notches too, I like that. I’ve had success after success with this recipe whereas others have been hit or miss. Feel free to share it with friends or point them to it here. Thanks for the feedback and sharing those tweaks. I think I’ll try your version next time :) – Brian