Coffeebrewer | Trail Coffee at its Best!

Coffeebrewer | Trail Coffee at its Best!

If there was just one reason to carry an ultralight stove with my on the trail it would not be for cooking or heating meals, it would be for making hot coffee!

I don’t drink a lot of coffee, I have a self-imposed limit of one cup a day, but I do enjoy my daily cup of Joe and even more so when I’m out hiking or on the trail – to me it is the perfect way to start my morning outdoors and the best time to chat with friends of just take in the beauty of the surroundings – I love it.

For simplicity and weight I tend to carry just a couple of packets of Starbucks Via instant microgrounds with me to satisfy my coffee cravings, but this has always been a trade-off of weight versus flavor – although the Via coffee is not and at all bad.

Sometimes though I’d be happy to take the extra time or carry just a little bit more weight in order to be able to get a really good cup of hot ‘fresh’ coffee, but I draw the line at carry any sort of dedicated coffee ‘gadget’ like the Snow Peak Titanium French Press – c’mon people!

Coffeebrewer ‘French Press’ Pouches

View of the internal filter

So you can imagine my excitement when I discovered the new Coffeebrewer pouches from Grower’s Cup. They seem to be the perfect middle ground between carrying dedicated coffee-making gear and bare-coffee grounds and a bandana (cowboy coffee).

The concept is simple: A lightweight (45g), one-time use pouch for brewing the perfect cup of Joe while out on the trail, it’s just taken a long time for anyone to figure it out and get it right.

The best way to describe Coffeebrewer pouches is probably as a disposable paper french press. Inside each pouch is a coffee filter, made of the same material used to make those boil in the bag rice packets, containing 26g of freshly ground specialty coffee. The coffee is actually ground inside the filter and immediately sealed to keep it as fresh as possible.

You can choose from some of the finest coffees from Africa and Latin/Central America with each individual batch of coffee produced in extremely limited quantities – Tanzania, Kenya, Honduras, Guatemala, Ethiopia, Bolivia, Nicaragua.

Coffeebrewer | Trail Coffee at its Best!

Using the pouches is the easy part. To brew 3 cups of delicious fresh coffee, simply open up a pouch, pour in the hot water, let it stand (in the pouch) for 5-8 mins, and serve! Simplicity itself.

The clever internal brewing system is designed to preserve the natural flavors of the coffee and oils to enhance the delicate taste and aromas that would normally only be achievable using a real French press.

In Action on the Trail
I took a bunch of the CoffeeBrewer packets out with me on a recent weekend hike and used them to brew up some fresh hot coffee using my Backcountry Boiler, I was not disappointed.

BCBoiler humming nicely

The first thing to do is to get yourself some hot water for your coffee. I fired up my Backcountry Boiler and then got ready with a packet of Ethiopian coffee. You start by pulling open the two top edges of the pouch to expose the internal filter and coffee grounds. Next you have to pull on the exposed red string/tape to remove it and open the pouring spout.

Pull apart the top edges

Remove red tag to open spout

The design of the Coffeebrewer pouch is similar to the popular freeze dried food packs that many backpackers like, in particular their ability to stand up by themselves. Before pouring in the very hot water, I puff out the base of the pouch so that it can stand up by itself while I pour the water – nice touch!

The gold within!

If I look inside I can see where the coffee grounds are, sitting in the attached filter material. Once the water is ready, this is where I pour it in. Then I seal it up using the ziplock-like plastic zippers along the inside of the two top edges. This not only keeps in the heat, it traps in the aromas of the coffee while it is brewing.

Pouring hot water into the pouch

At this point you have a couple of different options to consider for making the coffee to your specific liking. For example: if you happen to prefer your coffee slightly milder, then you could let it brew for only 4—5 minutes. If, like me, you prefer to have a much stronger and assertive cup of Joe, you can let it brew for a full 8—9 minutes. Just be sure to keep an eye on the clock, you don’t want to go to all this trouble and run a perfectly good batch of gourmet coffee.

Time to let it brew...

Another clever design touch is that the filter is deliberately placed high enough in the pouch to separate the grounds from the hot coffee underneath. This halts the brewing process and stop the coffee from going bitter like it can in a traditional French press.

Pouring out my delicious coffee

Pouring is easy to do using the small spout opening on the side of the pouch. And because the brewed coffee is separate from the grounds, which are trapped inside the filter, there’s no danger of getting bits of coffee grinds in your nice hot coffee. Nice!

Even though these pouches are a little on the large size and weigh 45g each, I’m finding it hard to justify going back to Starbucks Via (4g) just to save some extra weight. The quality of the beans and resulting taste from these pouches is so superior to Via that I’m a convert. Also, don’t forget that each of these pouches make 3 cups of great coffee, which would require at least three packets of Via (12g), or six if you’re like Jason Klass who likes it strong (24g),  to make an apples to apples comparison. That kinda closes the gap a bit doesn’t it.

Coffeebrewer | Trail Coffee at its Best!

That’s my new way to enjoy coffee on the trail. I highly recommend looking out for Coffeebrewer pouches and trying them if you get the opportunity. What do you think about these pouches and how do they compare to your way of making coffee on the trail?

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Disclosure: Grower’s Cup provided Brian’s Backpacking Blog with some complementary pouches of Coffeebrewer for the purpose of this exclusive review.

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  • http://twitter.com/DavidECreech Wilderness Dave

    Awesome!!  I’m going to need a lot of these…where did you find these?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      David, these are in Europe only right now – sorry – but I think that we might be able to convince Grower’s Cup to consider branching out to the US market in the very near future :) I think these would be a very popular product right?

  • http://twitter.com/DavidECreech David Creech

    Awesome!!  I’m going to need a lot of these…where did you find these?

  • Tiffannie Sorenson

    My husband and I use Folgers coffee singles.  It’s like a big tea bag of coffee.  Works well, tastes good, easy and light to pack.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Tiffannie, I’m not a big fan of Folgers, but it’s a personal taste thing. If those work great and taste good then it’s all good. It’s all about enjoying the coffee :) Thanks for sharing the link with others.

  • Tiffannie Sorenson

    My husband and I use Folgers coffee singles.  It’s like a big tea bag of coffee.  Works well, tastes good, easy and light to pack.
    http://www.amazon.com/Folgers-Classic-Singles-19-Count-Servings/dp/B001FA1KJO

  • Joshuajharkins

    Love your mug, Brian!

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Thanks Joshua! You can read all about it here: “A Kupilka Like no Other” :-)

  • Joshuajharkins

    Love your mug, Brian!

  • Qz4bhansen

    Hi…

    Even though I’m not a coffee drinker…great presentation…!! I’ll have to get some for guests.

  • Qz4bhansen

    Hi…

    Even though I’m not a coffee drinker…great presentation…!! I’ll have to get some for guests.

  • Knotty

    I’m also a Via (Italian Roast) fan on the trail but it’s nice to see a gourmet alternative.

    The big question is, what happened to your self imposed one cup limit? :-)

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Ha! So my self imposed limit tends to go out of the window when I’m traveling or on the trail – I need it more I guess. It’s not a doctor ordered thing, just something I like to watch so that I limit the amount of caffeine I intake. I’m getting older and need my sleep, and it seems to take less coffee to keep me awake than it used to.

  • Knotty

    I’m also a Via (Italian Roast) fan on the trail but it’s nice to see a gourmet alternative.

    The big question is, what happened to your self imposed one cup limit? :-)

  • Ryan Wheeler

    I’m a /big/ coffee drinker and have been trying to find a method that works best to keep myself fending off withdrawals on my thru. I’ll probably go with Via, just due to the weight/resupply factor, but if I’m going on a shorter hike? Well now, that’s a different story.

    I recently tested the GSI Ultralight Java Drip, which actually works pretty well, and will likely be my choice for caffeination on a weekend trip or something short enough where I can carry some fresh grounds easily. Either that, or make kahve, which is Turkish coffee. It’s made similarly to cowboy coffee. Mmmm, strong, But don’t drink that last sip!

    However, these pouches seem very intriguing. I’d very much like to try one out, see how it could work. I’m mostly curious about how they make 3 cups. Could you, say, brew the coffee for 4 minutes, pour off a cup of milder Joe, then let the rest brew for another 4-5 minutes for 2 cups of stronger flavor? My girlfriend likes her coffee to not punch her in the face with every sip, while I like my coffee to hit me like Mike Tyson. So if the pouches could brew in that style, then they seem like they’d be the perfect choice for taking on the trail when I head out with her!

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Hi Ryan, the GSI UL Java Drip is a cool looking little piece of gear isn’t? I just have a hard time buying coffee-specific gear, although I don’t know why that would be compared to all the other gear I have!

      The Coffeebrewer packets work the way you described for making three cups. You can pour in all the water and wait a few minutes to pour off a cup of milder joe and then let the rest of the water trickle through and brew for a stronger cup.

      Not all of the water passes through at once as the water reservoir under the filter can only hold just over a cup and half based on my use. It’s basic and simple, but it lets you use on pouch to make more than one coffee and determine the strength for each – if your head can handle that kinda math so early in the morning :) Cheers! ^BG

  • Ryan Wheeler

    I’m a /big/ coffee drinker and have been trying to find a method that works best to keep myself fending off withdrawals on my thru. I’ll probably go with Via, just due to the weight/resupply factor, but if I’m going on a shorter hike? Well now, that’s a different story.

    I recently tested the GSI Ultralight Java Drip, which actually works pretty well, and will likely be my choice for caffeination on a weekend trip or something short enough where I can carry some fresh grounds easily. Either that, or make kahve, which is Turkish coffee. It’s made similarly to cowboy coffee. Mmmm, strong, But don’t drink that last sip!

    However, these pouches seem very intriguing. I’d very much like to try one out, see how it could work. I’m mostly curious about how they make 3 cups. Could you, say, brew the coffee for 4 minutes, pour off a cup of milder Joe, then let the rest brew for another 4-5 minutes for 2 cups of stronger flavor? My girlfriend likes her coffee to not punch her in the face with every sip, while I like my coffee to hit me like Mike Tyson. So if the pouches could brew in that style, then they seem like they’d be the perfect choice for taking on the trail when I head out with her!

  • Matt

    Looks like a great product but I particularly like the mug!  Any thoughts where I might find one?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Hi Matt. The mug or cup shown is a Kupilka 21 from Finland and that particular one was customized by me so you won’t find another one exactly like it.

      You must be somewhat new to my blog because I’ve been a proponent of the Kupilka products for a long time now and even played a hand in bringing them to the US market through an outdoor distribution contact that I know.

      Here is a link to all of the Kupilka posts on my blog. You should be able to find dozens of online stores that sell Kupilka 21 cups now – if you have any issues let me know, be happy to help. ^BG

      • Mdproctormd

        thanks Brian – I’ll check it out and yeah, I am pretty new to your blog but I really like your presentation style. 

  • Matt

    Looks like a great product but I particularly like the mug!  Any thoughts where I might find one?

  • yimmoo

    Brian, I don’t read Chinese…  But I was at a plant startup in Weihai China a few years back, and a guy from Taiwan brought these foil packs of at least 6 different kinds of good coffee.  There was a drip filter in each one.  makes a 6 oz cup, but really conveinient!  I just found this on TAOBAO…  There may be other suppliers… Shipping to USA would kill it.  But it’s ca 60 cents a pack in China!   Looks similar to what I had…  http://item.taobao.com/item.htm?id=15207424983&

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Wow, thanks for sharing this link (by the way if you view this in Google Chrome it will translate for you) those are very interesting. I winder if any of my local Asian food markets would have those? Thanks!

  • yimmoo

    Brian, I don’t read Chinese…  But I was at a plant startup in Weihai China a few years back, and a guy from Taiwan brought these foil packs of at least 6 different kinds of good coffee.  There was a drip filter in each one.  makes a 6 oz cup, but really conveinient!  I just found this on TAOBAO…  There may be other suppliers… Shipping to USA would kill it.  But it’s ca 60 cents a pack in China!   Looks similar to what I had…  http://item.taobao.com/item.htm?id=15207424983&

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/IH6PXC3VTFEKNWNANN7KFC76AQ andy

    I haven’t ever done this while backpacking, but for a couple months while I was without a coffee maker I made coffee “Turkish” style (I actually learned this from a Turkish student group). This style is just very finely ground coffee put in the bottom of your cup and then you  pour your hot water over it. The coffee grounds settle to the bottom of the cup and make sludge there, and don’t affect the part you drink at all. Adding a splash of cold water after it’s set for a few minutes helps get the grounds to settle as well. 

    Of course, you do have to get the grounds out of your cup and deal with them when you’re done, but you don’t have to carry anything but the coffee grounds and a cup. 

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Thanks Andy, I’ve done this many times myself in a pinch, but didn’t know it was called Turkish style – learned something new.

      This is a really easy way to make pretty decent coffee, the only issue I ever had doing it this way was that the coffee can begin to taste bitter if I didn’t drink it in a reasonable timeframe – easy fix though, just drink up! Thanks.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/IH6PXC3VTFEKNWNANN7KFC76AQ andy

    I haven’t ever done this while backpacking, but for a couple months while I was without a coffee maker I made coffee “Turkish” style (I actually learned this from a Turkish student group). This style is just very finely ground coffee put in the bottom of your cup and then you  pour your hot water over it. The coffee grounds settle to the bottom of the cup and make sludge there, and don’t affect the part you drink at all. Adding a splash of cold water after it’s set for a few minutes helps get the grounds to settle as well. 

    Of course, you do have to get the grounds out of your cup and deal with them when you’re done, but you don’t have to carry anything but the coffee grounds and a cup. 

  • David Clack

    Don’t get me wrong, I love fresh coffee, but when out and about I use Kenco sachets and sugar sachets from Mcdonalds. I am all for an easy life. I too have a Kupilka, I get mocked for needing two cups of coffee though!

  • David Clack

    Don’t get me wrong, I love fresh coffee, but when out and about I use 
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kenco-Smooth-25-individual-sachets/dp/B006NU9G24 and sugar sachets from Mcdonalds. I am all for an easy life.
    I too have a Kupilka, I get mocked for needing two cups of coffee though!

  • http://twitter.com/bikemech_ca Paully The Wrench

    Interesting product, I think I may have to try it. My usual trail method (and what I use at home a lot) is a MSR Mugmate. Great little filter basket, very light weight. I grind my coffee at home, then seal it quickly in a ziplock pressing all the air out. Since I’m normally making for just me, I have a small amount of grind which folds and fits in the filter basket nicely. On trail, I use my ti evernew mug as a pot, boil water, put grinds in filter and insert the filter into the mug after boil. Lightweight, delicious gourmet coffees (usually fairly traded, single origin, or blends I’ve made roasting at home). I highly recommend the msr mugmate, I loved it on trails so much I use it at home lots, and bought an extra one for work.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Thanks Paully, I’ve looked at the MSR Mugmate a few times myself but never bought one. Great to hear it’s working for you. Seems like a simple lightweight solution! Thanks for sharing :)

  • http://twitter.com/bikemech_ca Paully The Wrench

    Interesting product, I think I may have to try it. My usual trail method (and what I use at home a lot) is a MSR Mugmate. Great little filter basket, very light weight. I grind my coffee at home, then seal it quickly in a ziplock pressing all the air out. Since I’m normally making for just me, I have a small amount of grind which folds and fits in the filter basket nicely. On trail, I use my ti evernew mug as a pot, boil water, put grinds in filter and insert the filter into the mug after boil. Lightweight, delicious gourmet coffees (usually fairly traded, single origin, or blends I’ve made roasting at home). I highly recommend the msr mugmate, I loved it on trails so much I use it at home lots, and bought an extra one for work.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Thanks Paully, I’ve looked at the MSR Mugmate a few times myself but never bought one. Great to hear it’s working for you. Seems like a simple lightweight solution! Thanks for sharing :)

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Thanks Andy, I’ve done this many times myself in a pinch, but didn’t know it was called Turkish style – learned something new.

    This is a really easy way to make pretty decent coffee, the only issue I ever had doing it this way was that the coffee can begin to taste bitter if I didn’t drink it in a reasonable timeframe – easy fix though, just drink up! Thanks.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Wow, thanks for sharing this link (by the way if you view this in Google Chrome it will translate for you) those are very interesting. I winder if any of my local Asian food markets would have those? Thanks!

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Hi Ryan, the GSI UL Java Drip is a cool looking little piece of gear isn’t? I just have a hard time buying coffee-specific gear, although I don’t know why that would be compared to all the other gear I have!

    The Coffeebrewer packets work the way you described for making three cups. You can pour in all the water and wait a few minutes to pour off a cup of milder joe and then let the rest of the water trickle through and brew for a stronger cup.

    Not all of the water passes through at once as the water reservoir under the filter can only hold just over a cup and half based on my use. It’s basic and simple, but it lets you use on pouch to make more than one coffee and determine the strength for each – if your head can handle that kinda math so early in the morning :) Cheers! ^BG

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Ha! So my self imposed limit tends to go out of the window when I’m traveling or on the trail – I need it more I guess. It’s not a doctor ordered thing, just something I like to watch so that I limit the amount of caffeine I intake. I’m getting older and need my sleep, and it seems to take less coffee to keep me awake than it used to.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Thanks Joshua! You can read all about it here: “A Kupilka Like no Other” :-)

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Tiffannie, I’m not a big fan of Folgers, but it’s a personal taste thing. If those work great and taste good then it’s all good. It’s all about enjoying the coffee :) Thanks for sharing the link with others.

  • Mdproctormd

    thanks Brian – I’ll check it out and yeah, I am pretty new to your blog but I really like your presentation style. 

  • Stephen

    oh my god my short trip prayers are answered! this is neat but i will find it hard to resist the easiness of VIA. but this is an excellent post.

  • Stephen

    oh my god my short trip prayers are answered! this is neat but i will find it hard to resist the easiness of VIA. but this is an excellent post.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    David, these are in Europe only right now – sorry – but I think that we might be able to convince Grower’s Cup to consider branching out to the US market in the very near future :) I think these would be a very popular product right?

  • http://profiles.google.com/nicolerobinmorris Robin Morris

    I’m hoping a friend I have in Germany will find some and bring them to the US when she comes here in May.  I would love to try this.

  • http://profiles.google.com/nicolerobinmorris Robin Morris

    I’m hoping a friend I have in Germany will find some and bring them to the US when she comes here in May.  I would love to try this.

  • http://www.hikinginfinland.com/ Hendrik Morkel

    Those sound swell, need to see if I can get some sent to Finland =) 

    Love the photos, btw, crisp in the foreground with a beautiful unfocussed background. 

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Thanks Hendrik! Coming from you, someone who’s photography I hold in very high esteem, that’s quite a compliment.

      I’ve been getting used to my Lumix GF2 and have found the setting that works for the types of shots I like to have on my blog – minimal depth of field with sharp focus on the subject only.

      It’s a work in progress, but I personally think the GF2 is helping me shoot the photos I’ve been wanting to for quite a while now but couldn’t with my point-and-shoot.

  • http://www.hikinginfinland.com/ Hendrik Morkel

    Those sound swell, need to see if I can get some sent to Finland =) 

    Love the photos, btw, crisp in the foreground with a beautiful unfocussed background. 

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Thanks Hendrik! Coming from you, someone who’s photography I hold in very high esteem, that’s quite a compliment.

    I’ve been getting used to my Lumix GF2 and have found the setting that works for the types of shots I like to have on my blog – minimal depth of field with sharp focus on the subject only.

    It’s a work in progress, but I personally think the GF2 is helping me shoot the photos I’ve been wanting to for quite a while now but couldn’t with my point-and-shoot.

  • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

    Great news! It looks like my blog post has helped stir up additional awareness of the Grower’s Cup products and is generating a lot of interest from other bloggers too, but remember you saw it here first!

    That makes me feel really good about what I do by sharing my findings and opinions here with all of you. It lets me help spread the word about high quality products that are relatively new (to the US market) and inform you of what’s new cool for outdoors.Hopefully soon we’ll start to see Coffeebrewer pouches showing up in stores all around us and we’ll all be able to enjoy freshly brewed gourmet coffee on the trail! ^BG

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Great news! It looks like my blog post has helped stir up additional awareness of the Grower’s Cup products and is generating a lot of interest from other bloggers too, but remember you saw it here first!

    That makes me feel really good about what I do by sharing my findings and opinions here with all of you. It lets me help spread the word about high quality products that are relatively new (to the US market) and inform you of what’s new cool for outdoors.Hopefully soon we’ll start to see Coffeebrewer pouches showing up in stores all around us and we’ll all be able to enjoy freshly brewed gourmet coffee on the trail! ^BG

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000127363649 Jordan Hipple

    how did you like the backcountry boiler, i assume youll be reviewing it soon

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000127363649 Jordan Hipple

    how did you like the backcountry boiler, i assume youll be reviewing it soon

  • Syncboy

    I’m surprised no one has commented yet on the environmental impact of this product.  It is a huge package containing a tiny amount of coffee with a lot of plastic and other materials.  I’m sure the coffee it produces is far superior to Via, but this is a giant thing to throw in the landfill after a trip.  

    They make a point to discuss on their website the environmental implications of their manufacturing process but compare it to driving a car or flying a plane, rather than a Via or Folgers single.  They are silent on the disposal of an item like this, which does not appear recyclable.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Compared to just about any other packaged outdoor food products this is no different. But I will look into this to see what I can find.

    • http://www.growerscup.com/ Ulrik

      Dear Syncboy, Thanks for your comment on the environment issue. You are right and yet you are also wrong, I will try and explain: We have tried to make the most environmentally friendly solution possible which is explained in more detail on our website. I.e. our pouch contains no aluminium at all and a very very insignificant amount of PET, which are the alarming parts in most packagings. PE and paper are not quite harmless and since PE is very much produced from oil derivatives – it can be compared to driving a car or flying.

      However, here is the important point: There are a lot of people who believes that BIODEGRADEABLE packaging is the absolute right thing as regards carbon foot print. This is true IF YOU DO leave your garbage in your garden or indeed in the nature. However, if you put it in the bin – biodegradeable packagings are a ticking bomb – if your bin ends up in a LANDFILL. In 2004/5 the british government published a very comprehensive study where it was concluded that when biodegradeable packaging is deposited in landfills BIODEGRADEABLE PACKAGING PRODUCES 10 TIMES AS MUCH METHAN GAS AS NORMAL PACKAGING MATERIALS. Methan gasses are one of the most aggressive gases when it comes to breaking down the Ozone layer.  There is a simple explanation, a biodegradeable packaging needs oxygene to decompose/mould. In a landfill with thousands of tons of garbage covered with 3 meters of soil and a golfcourse creates a microenvironment where there is no oxygene and the biodegradeable packaging will not decompose as they are meant to.

      I am sorry that this is a rather long explanation. However, we really care about the environment  and our packaging has been designed to do the least damnage to environment possible – thus also the very special pourspout design which is not a plastic spout. I hope that our answer makes sense to you.

      Saying this, if you brew a fresh coffee on a cafétierre then that is the best way you can brew a coffee and the most eco-friendly. Still, if one really cares about environment then it’s not enough to go after packaing – then one’s lifestyle needs to be adjusted accordingly. This will most certainly involve a minimum of travelling by car and airplane and investing in insulation of ones home to reduce heating or airconditioning. In Denmark, environment is very high on the agenda, but like most – ordinary people never seem to thing that a fun weekend flying to Paris counts in the battle against carbon footprint – and it’s quite normal to single out the consumption of plastic bags in the supermarket, as a feel good option in becoming an ECO warrior. However, being brutally honest it is such a little contribution compared to the carbon footprint of an active lifestyle involving travelling…

      Kind regards,
      Ulrik, Grower’s Cup

  • Syncboy

    I’m surprised no one has commented yet on the environmental impact of this product.  It is a huge package containing a tiny amount of coffee with a lot of plastic and other materials.  I’m sure the coffee it produces is far superior to Via, but this is a giant thing to throw in the landfill after a trip.  

    They make a point to discuss on their website the environmental implications of their manufacturing process but compare it to driving a car or flying a plane, rather than a Via or Folgers single.  They are silent on the disposal of an item like this, which does not appear recyclable.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Compared to just about any other packaged outdoor food products this is no different. But I will look into this to see what I can find.

  • Neill Currie

    Try “Gourmey” (sic) filter *wrappers*. A pack of 20 weighs next to nothing, and costs 95 cents. You grind your preferred beans as you wish, portion them out, and the Gourmey securely wraps the grinds in a neat little package for brewing.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Thanks Neill, I’m not familiar with those but will be Googling it right after this…

  • Neill Currie

    Try “Gourmey” (sic) filter *wrappers*. A pack of 20 weighs next to nothing, and costs 95 cents. You grind your preferred beans as you wish, portion them out, and the Gourmey securely wraps the grinds in a neat little package for brewing.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Thanks Neill, I’m not familiar with those but will be Googling it right after this…

  • http://renegadepilgrim.com/ RenegadePilgrim

    You also might want to check out Cabela’s…They have something similar to Grower’s, but it’s designed for larger groups, so not great for solo trips.  http://bit.ly/HLkO8z

    Also, for those of you with Trader Joe’s, they also make a 3-in-1 instant coffee with sugar and creamer.  I think it tastes better than Via, but it’s weaker, so you need two packs for a stronger cup.

    And finally, if you live anywhere with Asian markets, they have whole sections of coffee pouches, most of them with sugar/cream already added.

    The TJs packets are cheapest though…I think you get 10 packs for $2.

  • http://profiles.google.com/heather.knight.pdx Heather Knight

    You also might want to check out Cabela’s…They have something similar to Grower’s, but it’s designed for larger groups, so not great for solo trips.  http://bit.ly/HLkO8z

    Also, for those of you with Trader Joe’s, they also make a 3-in-1 instant coffee with sugar and creamer.  I think it tastes better than Via, but it’s weaker, so you need two packs for a stronger cup.

    And finally, if you live anywhere with Asian markets, they have whole sections of coffee pouches, most of them with sugar/cream already added.

    The TJs packets are cheapest though…I think you get 10 packs for $2.

  • Tor Magnus Castberg

    Hi Brian,

    In the light of the review and following discussion on http://www.backpackingnorth.com/2012/06/bitter-tears-of-arabica-growers-cup.html, what’s you current take on Grower’s Cup? How many packs have you bought after your initial tasting 10 months ago?

    Cheers,
    Tor Magnus

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Tor – I’ve actually bought quite a few more since my original review and have experienced some “less than gourmet” coffee myself on occasion. For example, I’ve noticed that the Ethiopian coffee is that I bought recently was not very good at all and nothing like the first pack I tested. Some of the others were bitter or bland, but the Guatemalan continues to be a winner.

      I also think it has something to do with the temperature of the water being poured over the grounds. If I boil the water, then let it cool off for 3-5 minutes and use that, the flavor of the coffee is smooth and subtle. If I pour water that has just come to a rolling boil over the coffee grounds then every packet results in bitter tasting coffee :(

      Have you tried Growers Cyup or experimented with different temperature water?

      • Tor Magnus Castberg

        I’ve only tried it once under less than ideal conditions (coffee wise, not camping wise), and to be honest I didn’t think much of it. The issue here might be very uneven batches of coffee and the unknown storage time after it has been roasted and ground.

        On the topic of water though I was under the impression that hotter is better for coffee?

        • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

          I don’t know about the water temp question. Might be time to do some Googling. I might even shoot Growers Cup and email and ask them :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/brian.andrews.395891 Brian Andrews

    My buddies and I go winter camping every year and all I can imagine is waking up and getting the fire going, heating up some water to pour into the pouch and letting it sit inside my jacket while it steeps, and then enjoying a lovely cup of morning joe. Sounds like a winning product to me!