Titanium Foil Esbit ‘Tray’ Stove a.k.a ‘BGET’

Titanium Esbit 'Tray' Stove

I have a love-hate relationship with Esbit fuel tabs. I want to love them, I really do, but they seem to never work quite right for me so I end up getting frustrated and hating them.

The Short Burn Time Issue

You may recall that a few weeks ago I posted a blog article about my frustration with the consistently poor burn times (typically under 7mins per tab) that I was experiencing with my Esbit tabs. In fact my results were so bad that I reached out to Campmor to inquire if they’d had a bad batch of Esbits or any other reports of poor performance? They hadn’t, but without hesitation they sent me replacements for all three boxes that I had bought from them (BTW – Campmor customer service has always been superb).

Upon testing one of the ‘new’ Esbit tabs I got the same results as before, suggesting that it was not actually the fuel tabs themselves but rather the stove I was using or possibly the way I was using them.

Esbit Stove

Esbit Stove Testing

All this time I had been using a MYOG Esbit stove design based on the titanium ones that both John Roan of Mountain Ultralight and JJ of JERMM’s Outside had recently each made and written about. My stove, while identical in design to the ones that John and JJ were using, was made from an aluminum Bud Light beer bottle instead of titanium foil.

I was pretty sure that the difference in material was not the cause of the drastically reduced burn rates that I had been experiencing. A comment on my previous blog post from Chad (aka Stick of Stick’s Blog) mentioned that he was using the Ti Esbit Folding Stove that had a tray style holder in the center of the stove that captured the liquid that is released from a burning Esbit tab. He concluded that the reason he was getting 15 minute plus burn times from each fuel tab was probably due to the liquid fuel continuing to burn. The extremely simple stove I had made did not capture the Esbit liquid fuel as it was released during the burn – in theory reducing the potential burn time.

I was also very fortunate to receive a GVP/Caldera-Keg stove setup from Martin Rye (Summit and Valley Blog) that included a genuine, still sealed, UK Esbit tab. Thanks Martin! However, when I used the Esbit tab that Martin had sent me in my MYOG Esbit stove, I got the same lousy burn time – further proof that my stove was a POS. I tested one of my old (bad) fuel tabs in the stove that Martin sent me and got a burn time of over 12 minutes right off the bat! #$@!^$

Making a Better Esbit Stove

Not wanting to simply copy the stove that John had made, but this time using titanium foil instead of aluminum, I decided to come up with an entirely new titanium stove design – one that would incorporate the tray aspect that Chad had mentioned.

I knew that I would eventually want to make the final version out of shiny new titanium foil, for weight and the obvious Ti cool factor, so I ordered a 22”x6” roll of the 0.005” thick titanium foil from Titanium Goat ($14).

Meanwhile, I began drawing a template for the new design that I had in my head. My intent was to make a variation of the one-piece stove that John had created, but with the addition of a small tray to catch the liquid fuel. I created a template at actual size using Adobe Illustrator, printed it out on paper and quickly made a mockup of the stove using… yes you guessed it, aluminum from a Bud Light beer bottle. If you hadn’t already figure it out, I have a LOT of Bud Light aluminum beer bottles.

Here’s what the first aluminum Esbit ‘tray’ stove looked like.

Esbit MYOG stove with tray

It’s by no means pretty, but to my utter amazement, the very first Esbit tab that I burned in this prototype (which was from my old stock of supposedly bad fuel tabs) burned for over 15 minutes! In fact I was so surprised by this that I burned another three Esbit tabs in it just to make sure it wasn’t a fluke. It wasn’t.

So the concept of capturing the liquid fuel from the burning Esbit tab seemed to be pretty sound. I made a few minor adjustments to the template to allow for a fraction more room for the fuel tab to sit better in the stove.

Hat’s off to Titanium Goat for a speedy and efficient deliver process. My new roll of titanium foil showed up just three days after ordering using standard shipping. I set to work making a titanium version of the same tray stove.

Making a titanium esbit stove

If you’ve never used titanium foil before for making a windscreen or any other MYOG project, you might be surprised to learn that it can be cut very easily with just a good pair of ordinary scissors. You can punch holes using a standard hole punch that you would use for paper, with a little extra effort. You don’t necessarily need a lot of expensive tools to work with it.

Titanium foil marked out and ready to cut

The Ti foil I bought was about the same thickness as a sheet of standard printer paper, so it’s very easy to make a prototype out of paper first. Once you have it right in paper form you can trace it directly onto the titanium foil and begin cutting it out.

Paper mockup of esbit stove

Here is a paper prototype of the Esbit tray stove showing the long side flaps that extend out from the two vertical side panels and which will eventually be tucked under the two end flaps that make up the legs of the stove.

Paper mockup of esbit stove

This is the same paper prototype with the long flaps folded under the legs of the stove to form a quasi-sealed corner for the tray that will stop the liquid fuel from dripping out (lesson learned from a previous attempt). If it isn’t immediately obvious by looking at these photos, I was having a lot of fun playing with this project.

Using a pair of cheap paper scissors that I didn’t care too much about, I started cutting out the titanium version of the stove paying close attention not to over cut any of the joints. The stove is really small and it is very easy to accidentally snip off the thin flaps.

Titanium Esbit 'Tray' Stove

I used the straight edge of a metal ruler to help make neat folds in the foil, starting with the two legs flaps. I folded the legs upward first to form the sides of the tray. Then folded them over and back down along the line that you can see in the photo below. This fold was particularly tricky as there was no good way to lean or press against the ruler as a guide.

Titanium Esbit 'Tray' Stove

Here is a view of the stove turned upside down showing the two leg flaps being carefully folded back over. This was the hardest part or fold of the entire project. I ruined two versions of the titanium template by rushing this step, so take your time and think this fold through in your head.

Once I had the leg flaps almost were I needed them to be, I folded both pairs of the long tabs in and under the legs to form the corners of the tray.

Titanium Esbit 'Tray' Stove

Then I flipped the stove back up the right way and slowly finished the bend of the legs. I ended up using a pair of lineman’s pliers to neatly squeeze the folded edge of the legs and close up the crease. This would have been so much better via video!

After trimming off the tips of the corners to make it a little more finger friendly, the stove was all done! The aluminum prototype of this same stove weighed a whopping 4g on my regular electronic scales. The titanium version not only looked extremely cool, it weighed in at barely 1g.

I dug out my set of pocket scales to see if I could get a more accurate reading of the weight. By my pocket scales the titanium tray stove weighed 0.97g.

Titanium Esbit 'Tray' Stove

Next I think I’m going to start working on a titanium windscreen for this stove using some of the left over foil that I have. The pristine little titanium stove shown below no longer looks like that. I’ve burned a handful of Esbit tabs using it now and have had consistently good burn times of upward of 15 minutes.

Titanium Esbit 'Tray' Stove

I’ll admit that one significant downside of the ‘tray’ design is that it retains all of the crud and residue that get’s left behind after burning an Esbit tab. If I recall, the main driving factor of John Roan’s simple Esbit stove design was his reluctance to have to clean Esbit crud out of the creases of his Trail Designs Gram Cracker stove.

I’m actually okay with that though, at least for now. After more use I may get tired of the crud build up, but I still have a good case of STOS (Shiny Titanium Object Syndrome). We’ll see how long that lasts before I get the urge to make a new stove.

I’m finally happy using Esbit fuel tabs. I’m definitely not head over heals in love with them, but I will be carrying this stove and a handful of fuel tabs with me on the next couple of backpacking trips that are coming up. You can download my template to make your own version of this stove here: Esbit Tray Stove Template (PDF). This is free for personal use, but NOT for commercial production and sale. Please contact me directly if you are interested in making this stove for commercial use.


Feedback from other Backpackers

John Abela (HikeLighter.com): John recently posted a wonderful, detailed review and analysis of my titanium Esbit tray stove via his blog. John has forever coined the term “BGET” or Brian Green Esbit Tray – love it! Thanks John.

John Donewar (Newton on BackpackingLight): I’ve found a reason for me personally to make the switch and scratched my MYOG itch at the same time. Thanks to the generosity of Brian Green posting a link to a pdf of a template for this stove on his backpacking blog I had an easy job of constructing this stove.

Andrew Weldon (hypnolobster on BackpackingLight): Wow, that’s some exceptionally clean folding (Newton). Did you do it in the steps Brian Green wrote, or did you find a better way? I’ve made 3 now (backups), and while it’s a piece of cake, it’s never really gorgeous like that.Love the tray though. I’m getting 8-9m boils consistently and up to 15m usable burn, 18ish minutes total.

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  • http://twitter.com/s_tranter_photo Simon Tranter

    Great stove! Certainly better than my MYOG attempt, I would love to have a go making this if you would share the link to the printable version ;-)
    Re: the residue, I cut a little rectangle of baking sheet to fit in the bottom of the stove to burn the esbit on, kind of a ‘stove liner’. It’s easy to remove so there is less crud left in the stove, hardly weighs a thing either.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      You use a foil liner for a sub-1g Esbit stove? Are you insane? How do you justify the extra weight :-p

      That’s a very simple solution to the crud problem. Fortunately so it soaking the stove in hot soapy water. But yours seems like less work.

      I’ll save the Adobe Illustrator file as a PDF and post a link at the bottom of this blog later today for anyone who wants to download. I’d love to read or see photos about how it goes.

      Thanks Simon!

      • http://twitter.com/s_tranter_photo Simon Tranter

        lol yes adding 40-50% of the stove weight is just insane, but it’s the way i roll ;-)

        Thanks for sharing, I will give it a go and maybe post a pic or 2 on twitter for you.

        I like using esbit, mainly because it can be blown out and any leftovers used up, just seems a more efficient use of the fuel that way.

      • Snctool

        Brian, FYI, the biolite’s have started shipping. I will get mine tomorrow.

        • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

          Me too! I’m so excited :)

  • Stephen

    Nice, now I’m willing to take a 20th look at Esbit :)

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I definitely know how you feel. I pretty happy with this little chap and I’m finally getting the burn times I had wanted. As they say, the 20th look is the charm!

      • Stephen

        Ok, I’m impressed…made one out of a budlight bottle and fired up 1cup of 70F water in a Foster’s Pot I have from minibulldesign.com with the following results: boil time 6m40s, total burn time 15m45s  I’ve never seen as good a result from an Esbit tab.  Used a four loop pot stand and it scortched my wooden bench top when I had a small wind screen around it.  I would suspect that it would result in a sub 10min boil time for 2 cups but I’ll try that out next.  Wow, if this works that well I will consider buying some titanium and making one out of it.  Thanks!

        • Stephen

          Ok, did two burn tests outside in the wind as it was a windy day.  I used two windscreens, one was better than the other but I noticed one key flaw.  The gaps on the corners of the “tray” allow the liquid fuel to leak out in large amounts.  So the burn time was cut to 10m total time and it barely brought two cups to almost a boil.  So some means of sealing the tray is needed or it’s not a viable option.

          • Jon

            Given that the design is similar to the Gram Cracker, the issue may be more windscreen related than stove related.  Just a thought.

          • Stephen

            Maybe but the burning fluid on the bricks indicated to me that the corners were leaking.  The windscreen was pretty tight too.  Like to hear if anyone else has a similar problem.

          • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

            Not viable? I’m not planning on going into full-scale production with this thing, I was merely tinkering.

            That said, there does seem to be room for improvement in sealing the corners of the tray. My attempt at doing so with a simple fold must not be sufficient, although I haven’t experienced as bad of a result as Stephen has.

            Ideally the corner should be a weld of some sort but I was trying to keep this as simple and MYOG as possible. I don’t have the equipment to start playing around with welding though I wish I did.

            Therefore I’m going to turn to the ultralight stovies best friend – JB Weld. I’ll try adding just a hair of JB Weld compound to the corner flaps to see if that solves the “leaking” tray issue.

            Other than that, or a revised version of the design I don’t have much else to offer you. Of course I’ll give you a full refund including shipping on your stove if you are not happy :-)

          • Stephen

            I think the design is good just needs those corners sealed.  As I posted on FB: 
            Made a 2nd stove and use high temp tape to wrap behind the tabs to make a better seal. Used the stove outside in some wind with a windscreen. 2cup boil time 12m10s and total burn time of almost 16m with no scorch marks on the surface below.

          • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

            I’ve never heard of high temperature tape. How exactly dd you wrap it behind the tabs? Great to hear that it improved the performance and burn times.

          • Stephen

            Sorry never replied, the tape is the foil style tape used on furnaces and duct work.  Just taped under the last bend for the legs.

          • David Gardner

            Hey Brian, did you ever try the JB Weld to seal the corners? I tried hi temp aluminum duct tape but the adhesive burned off after a few times. I’ve used JB Weld on some aluminum alcohol stoves and it could not take the heat, so I’m curious if it worked on your Esbit burner.

            Also, it’s not terribly difficult to make a small spot welder using the ballast from an old microwave oven. I did it after watching a few how-to videos on YouTube. It works well on the Ti foil from Titanium Goat.

          • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

            Hey David, I did try JB weld and it worked great – although it didn’t look as clean and neat as I had hoped, maybe it would get better f I made more.

            I did not know about the microwave spot welder. That’s awesome! Do you happen to have the link handy? If not I’m sure I can Google it :)

  • James Conley

    curious to see what you do for a pot stand and a windscreen.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I am too, any thoughts or suggestions?

  • Jon

    Nice design Brian!  I wonder if you could shorten the legs a bit, you know to shave off all of that excess weight and all.  ;)

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Jon, that’s pure genius! Maybe I could even drill holes in them to skeletonize it :-p

  • Qz4bhansen

    Do you burn all four pieces (if broken up) together, or just an individual 1/4 that is broken off?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I’ve never personally broken an Esbit tab up into pieces or quarters to burn it. I made this little stove to work perfectly with a whole Esbit tab. I do now blow out a burning tab if I’ve brought my water to a boil and there is enough left to re-use, that had been possible until now.

      Does anyone else break up their Esbit tabs to use them?

  • Snctool

    Hey Brian,

    Very lightweight stove but would be so easy to crush unless protected with a container of some sort…cooking pot I suppose which you have to carry anyway.

    I have not tried the esbit route in designing lightweight backpacking stoves. I have designed woodburning varieties which smoke up cooking pots and of course you have to be able to find dry tinder.

    My best design is a universal made from bud lite bottle (weighing in at 1oz.) and will boil 2 cups of water in approximately 5 minutes or simmer for over 1 hour on 3 oz. of alcohol and any leftover fuel can be conveniently poured back into the bottle.

    Your esbit lightweight design does give me time to ponder.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I’m especially fond of wood burning stoves AND I have a lot of bud lite bottles, I’d love to see or learn more about your stove if you don’t mind sharing?

      • Snctool

        Brian,

        I do not mind sharing my design with you and all. I can email you pictures and give you dimensions if you like. I am a machinist and draw with Autocad.

        My stove burner consists of 3 parts press fitted together with the top edge rolled out and over…making it super strong. the simmer ring is also made from the bottle as well as the snuffer cap. All parts are bud lite bottle parts. I also make super light weight drinking cups from the same bud light bottles with the rolled edge producing a super strong drinking cup.

        Send an appropriate email and I will respond.

  • Carole

    Brian, I’m curious about your stuff too.  Can you post it here?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Carole, I’m not quite sure what you’re asking about? Can you be more specific?

  • Carole

    The pictures, dimensions/design of your stove with simmer ring and snuffer cap, as well as your drinking cup.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Ah, you’re talking about the stove and set up that Snctool mentioned – not mine. That’s why I was confused. I’d be happy to share his stove details here and even a link to where you can order/buy them if he wants, but I’ll need to get confirmation from him first. I have his email so let me ask him :) From the pics and info he sent me it looks like he is making some really nice pieces of gear!

  • Mickey McTigue

    Brian,  You can try a “bread pan corner fold”.  Cut out the stove but do not cut the corners all the way to the bottom but stop even with the hight of the pan at the leg folds.  Then carefully bend all the sides up while also bending the excess corner material out into a triangle fold a little at a time so it ends up where your original tab went.  This way there is no opening in the metal in the corners.  Check out a steel bread pan for more details.

  • Swatdoc12498

    just made an aluminum stove.  I love it!  will make it in Ti and carry for UL backpacking.  I am giving away my Gram cracker for sure!  THANKS for the template.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      You’re welcome. There’s really not a huge difference between the aluminum and Ti version of these stoves – more of a prestige thing :) If you take any photos of the stove in use be sure to share them!

  • Swatdoc12498

    just made an aluminum stove.  I love it!  will make it in Ti and carry for UL backpacking.  I am giving away my Gram cracker for sure!  THANKS for the template.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    You’re welcome. There’s really not a huge difference between the aluminum and Ti version of these stoves – more of a prestige thing :) If you take any photos of the stove in use be sure to share them!

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    I’ve never heard of high temperature tape. How exactly dd you wrap it behind the tabs? Great to hear that it improved the performance and burn times.

  • Stephen

    I think the design is good just needs those corners sealed.  As I posted on FB: 
    Made a 2nd stove and use high temp tape to wrap behind the tabs to make a better seal. Used the stove outside in some wind with a windscreen. 2cup boil time 12m10s and total burn time of almost 16m with no scorch marks on the surface below.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    I am too, any thoughts or suggestions?

  • Hermann

    Are there any comparisons to the Roy Robinson Cat stove in terms of efficiency and weight? 
    http://royrobinson.homestead.com/Cat_Stove.html

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Hermann, I’ve never used (or much liked) the cat stove, so I can’t give any first hand comparison data. I believe Roy said he could bring 1 pint (16oz or two cups) to a boil in about 5 minutes, if so that’s pretty good.

      I will say that the Snow Leopard is made more robust than the Cat stove from the perspective of the windscreen. I’ll look more at the cat stove and compare what I find. Are you a fan or user of the Cat stove?

  • Hermann

    Are there any comparisons to the Roy Robinson Cat stove in terms of efficiency and weight? 
    http://royrobinson.homestead.com/Cat_Stove.html

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Hermann, I’ve never used (or much liked) the cat stove, so I can’t give any first hand comparison data. I believe Roy said he could bring 1 pint (16oz or two cups) to a boil in about 5 minutes, if so that’s pretty good.

    I will say that the Snow Leopard is made more robust than the Cat stove from the perspective of the windscreen. I’ll look more at the cat stove and compare what I find. Are you a fan or user of the Cat stove?

  • Brian Literman

    Brian, just curious over here. Why do you need the legs? Wouldn’t it be better if you just have a bottom and fold up 4 sides? You could bury the bottom in some dirt for insulation.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      The legs are to raise the stove up high enough to be the right height underneath my pot which is held at a fixed height by the windscreen. You could make it without the leg flaps and simply place a small rock underneath it to elevate it – but then you’re always messing with it and guessing the right.optimal height.

  • Brian Literman

    Brian, just curious over here. Why do you need the legs? Wouldn’t it be better if you just have a bottom and fold up 4 sides? You could bury the bottom in some dirt for insulation.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    The legs are to raise the stove up high enough to be the right height underneath my pot which is held at a fixed height by the windscreen. You could make it without the leg flaps and simply place a small rock underneath it to elevate it – but then you’re always messing with it and guessing the right.optimal height.

  • Nocona

    After a week or so of burning and crud build-up, the crud will just flake off.  It looks like an old cracked plastic film at that point.

  • Nocona

    After a week or so of burning and crud build-up, the crud will just flake off.  It looks like an old cracked plastic film at that point.

  • biednick

    Any chance you can either post here or email me a PDF or other file with the template for this? I never seem to get it quite right.

    • biednick

      I now see the pdf i somehow missed. Sorry.

      • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

        No big deal. Do you have what you need? I believe that Jon Fong at Flat Cat Gear has posted a detailed CAD drawing of my Esbit Tray Stove on his website and has stopped making his own version – that’s pretty cool of him :)

        • biednick

          Yep, I just finished making an aluminum one, came out perfect. Not sure it I’ll do a titanium one or not.

          • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

            The weight saving for a titanium one is not worth the price to buy the materials really – it was more a matter of “I could, so I did” – let me know how it works out for you :)

          • biednick

            Ahh it was one of those things. I kind of figured that, a whole 3 grams won’t break your back.

  • biednick

    Any chance you can either post here or email me a PDF or other file with the template for this? I never seem to get it quite right.

  • biednick

    I now see the pdf i somehow missed. Sorry.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    No big deal. Do you have what you need? I believe that Jon Fong at Flat Cat Gear has posted a detailed CAD drawing of my Esbit Tray Stove on his website and has stopped making his own version – that’s pretty cool of him :)

  • biednick

    Yep, I just finished making an aluminum one, came out perfect. Not sure it I’ll do a titanium one or not.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    The weight saving for a titanium one is not worth the price to buy the materials really – it was more a matter of “I could, so I did” – let me know how it works out for you :)

  • Snctool

    Brian, FYI, the biolite’s have started shipping. I will get mine tomorrow.

  • biednick

    Ahh it was one of those things. I kind of figured that, a whole 3 grams won’t break your back.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Me too! I’m so excited :)

  • Chad patzer/exup

    Hey Brian, great job on the stove. Im curious though, if you took off the legs to it, couldn’t you just adjust the height of you pot stand and wind screen and save a little weight oppose to keeping the legs to fit to the other components. Unless of course you use the wind screen and pot stand with another stove that needs the height it makes plenty sense. Either way I think it looks way cooler with the legs.

    For a pot stand you could use 3-4 ti stakes. I recently saw a guy made a “template” from foil with holes in it where the stake need to go to make the perfect pot stand. You could make a cool template out of titanium.

    Thanks a bunch for the template. I’m going to make me one.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Ha! Do you have any idea how little amount of weight you will save by removing the legs on a titanium version? About the same as a four Chia seeds :-]

      I think that the better reason for removing them would be as personal preference or special use. I offer this up as my preferred version but hope and encourage you to customize it to suit your needs, you won’t hurt my feelings – in fact you’ll probably improve upon it.

      If you do make one or modify this concept let me know and I’ll happily post it (with photos) as an alternative version with full attribution.

  • Chad patzer/exup

    Hey Brian, great job on the stove. Im curious though, if you took off the legs to it, couldn’t you just adjust the height of you pot stand and wind screen and save a little weight oppose to keeping the legs to fit to the other components. Unless of course you use the wind screen and pot stand with another stove that needs the height it makes plenty sense. Either way I think it looks way cooler with the legs.

    For a pot stand you could use 3-4 ti stakes. I recently saw a guy made a “template” from foil with holes in it where the stake need to go to make the perfect pot stand. You could make a cool template out of titanium.

    Thanks a bunch for the template. I’m going to make me one.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Ha! Do you have any idea how little amount of weight you will save by removing the legs on a titanium version? About the same as a four Chia seeds :-]

    I think that the better reason for removing them would be as personal preference or special use. I offer this up as my preferred version but hope and encourage you to customize it to suit your needs, you won’t hurt my feelings – in fact you’ll probably improve upon it.

    If you do make one or modify this concept let me know and I’ll happily post it (with photos) as an alternative version with full attribution.

  • Chad patzer

    Hey Brian, I never meant to offend you or put down your design. I think it’s great and that’s why I used it. I think it’s even better with the legs because it looks cooler. I was simply suggesting if you could cut the legs off you could loose about a half inch in both you pot stand and wind screen which equaled out to be about 6 grams for me. Not much but it’s something and it also reduced my wind screen just enough to make it fit in my mld 475 if I choose to take that.

    Also I decided to change the pot stand to usin my wind creen with 2 stakes going through it which ended up saving me 5 grams.

    Without the legs in well ventilated garage with some wind but not much the esbit tab burned for exactly 20.11 and about 18 min were useful burn. It boiled 16oz in a fosters pot in 11 min. These were perfect conditions, and though this first burn was proof enough to me that your design works amazing (not mine) I’m certain not using the legs makes not difference other being better ventilated with legs? If you’d like to see the stove check out my instagram. Thanks for the great design.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I’m not offended at all. Hack away at the design and improve it by all means, even let me know what you come up with. I have thick skin and was trying to be funny with you – apologies if that didn’t come out right. Go for it!

  • Chad patzer

    Hey Brian, I never meant to offend you or put down your design. I think it’s great and that’s why I used it. I think it’s even better with the legs because it looks cooler. I was simply suggesting if you could cut the legs off you could loose about a half inch in both you pot stand and wind screen which equaled out to be about 6 grams for me. Not much but it’s something and it also reduced my wind screen just enough to make it fit in my mld 475 if I choose to take that.

    Also I decided to change the pot stand to usin my wind creen with 2 stakes going through it which ended up saving me 5 grams.

    Without the legs in well ventilated garage with some wind but not much the esbit tab burned for exactly 20.11 and about 18 min were useful burn. It boiled 16oz in a fosters pot in 11 min. These were perfect conditions, and though this first burn was proof enough to me that your design works amazing (not mine) I’m certain not using the legs makes not difference other being better ventilated with legs? If you’d like to see the stove check out my instagram. Thanks for the great design.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    I’m not offended at all. Hack away at the design and improve it by all means, even let me know what you come up with. I have thick skin and was trying to be funny with you – apologies if that didn’t come out right. Go for it!

  • retiredsp107

    I hope this works still. You mention that you got a 22 inch sheet of the titanium foil…..they are out of stock but do have 12 inch…I gather from the template that 12 inch works and that you get more than one of of each sheet of foil? You also mentioned that you were looking at a wind screen for it…..did that ever develop.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      The 12 inch will work fine for making the tray, or two! I was going to make a windscreen and maybe I still will, but I never got round to making one. The Flat Cat Snow Leopard system kinda trumped the need to have to make a windscreen :)

  • retiredsp107

    Thanks for the reply Brian…..I ordered the 12 inch…looking forward to giving one of these a try this summer. Your sharing of the template is greatly appreciated. I’ve got a wind screen and pot stand that will work nicely with this stove that still keeps the weight were I like it and sportsman guide has a good sale of 100 tabs for 44 dollars. Thanks once again….

  • http://www.mcdowellcrook.com/ mcd

    fantastic! I made one today and it works great. Burn time over 15 minutes. Thanks!