Making Denatured Alcohol User Friendly

Food Coloring

Something I get asked a lot is “why is the denatured alcohol you use in your stove burning video green?” Well the simple answer is so that I can see it more easily, but there are other reasons why I do this to my fuel. It’s a really simple trick that I like to use so I thought I’d take the time to share it here.

Denatured alcohol is clear, highly flammable and generally not a good thing to swallow – you already know this of course. However, your new hiking buddy who just grabbed the innocuous looking unlabeled water bottle that you carry your fuel in and is about to take a swig of out of it also probably knows this, but doesn’t know what’s inside the bottle because it looks just like water!!!

Alcohol Bottle and Food Coloring

I know denatured alcohol has a pretty pungent smell to it, but trust me when I say that I have seen, on more than one occasion, people pick up and take a chug on a water bottle that contained denatured alcohol by mistake – it’s a horrible thing and extremely dangerous especially if you’re already a fair way into your hike.

So the first thing you must always do to your fuel bottle is CLEARLY label it. Large bold type and skull and cross bones are definitely applicable here. If you do nothing else after reading this post than pick up a Sharpie and label your fuel bottle then you’ve at least done something important.

So, getting back to the green colored alcohol question, there is one other thing I like to do with my denatured alcohol that definitely helps with the safety issue of accidental drinking and which has some additional benefits – I add food coloring to it! Green as a matter of fact.

Adding food coloring to denatured alcohol

Two or three drops of food coloring added to a full 16oz bottle of denatured alcohol is enough to turn it a very unnatural color and alert any unsuspecting thirsty hiker that it is something other than plain water inside. As I said I like to use green because there are very few drinks or liquids that I carry in a large bottle that would be bright green in color. This works even better if the bottle you are using is clear or transparent unlike the green bottle I am showing in the demo, but you get the point.

In my experience, adding two or three drops of food coloring to a large amount of denatured alcohol does nothing to impact the efficiency of the fuel, at least none that I can notice. If you don’t like the idea of doing this then that’s fine with me, it works for me and so I thought I’d share it.

Measuring out the alcohol

I originally used the food coloring trick to avoid accidental consumption of my fuel, but have found that there are additional benefits of the coloring that I had not anticipated, such as making it much easier to measure and see where you are pouring it.

Sometimes when I’m out on the trail in bright daylight it can be very hard to see the denatured alcohol as I’m pouring it into the stove or around the priming ring depending on which stove I am using. Having the food coloring added to the alcohol makes it much more visible and relatively easy to see where I am pouring the fuel.

I don’t always measure my fuel before pouring it into the stove, again it really depends on what stove I am using, but this is another area where having the food coloring added to the fuel can make measuring it much easier to see.

Pouring alcohol in the stove

And for those of you that have asked, the green food coloring does not make the flame more visible! You’ll have to continue be careful about the sleeves of you fleece or base layer going up in flames as you reach over the stove and pick up your cup or pot. I wish the food coloring made the flame easier to see, but that has not been the case for me – so please be careful!

Have you ever tried adding food coloring to your denatured alcohol?

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  • http://plutosonium.blogspot.com Amy Forinash

    That’s a great tip!  I am not worried about chugging my own denatured alcohol, but I could easily see a friend getting it by accident after asking if they could use some of my water.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Thanks Amy, despite the smell of denatured alcohol I’ve seen plenty of thirst hikers chug on fuel by mistake. It’s never happened with bright green fuel :-)

  • http://plutosonium.blogspot.com/ Amy Forinash

    That’s a great tip!  I am not worried about chugging my own denatured alcohol, but I could easily see a friend getting it by accident after asking if they could use some of my water.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Thanks Amy, despite the smell of denatured alcohol I’ve seen plenty of thirst hikers chug on fuel by mistake. It’s never happened with bright green fuel :-)

  • http://listeningtothewinds.blogspot.com/ Brad Neal

    I have always used heat but only had the problem once and that was with the exwife and the bottle was clearly marked “DO NOT DRINK, POISON… THIS IS NOT WATER”.. Im guessing I have missed something with your stove, what version is the sove you are showing pictured? I dont think I have seen one like that before.. is it more efficient with the can flaps like that?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      It’s a prototype variation of the new Flatcat stove made for use with cups like Snow Peaks. I am testing it for the manufacturer  at the moment so I’m not at liberty to say much more at this point – expect a post all about it in near future! Wicked little stove BTW :-)

      • http://listeningtothewinds.blogspot.com/ Brad Neal

        Nice, would be nice to do that myself… never attempted to test stuff for other people though

        • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

          It’s something I thoroughly enjoy. It takes more time than you would think to do a really detailed test of a product, make sure you are using it in the intended way, in the right environment, take accurate notes, shoot photos and write up the blog post or feedback email (I don’t blog all the equipment I test, about 50/50).

          I get a kick out of seeing the feedback and suggestions I provide be rolled into improvements in the final product, that’s pretty cool to me.

  • http://listeningtothewinds.blogspot.com/ Brad Neal

    I have always used heat but only had the problem once and that was with the exwife and the bottle was clearly marked “DO NOT DRINK, POISON… THIS IS NOT WATER”.. Im guessing I have missed something with your stove, what version is the sove you are showing pictured? I dont think I have seen one like that before.. is it more efficient with the can flaps like that?

  • JJ_Mathes

    Excellent tip Brian!  I keep a patch of HOT PINK duct tape on my bottle with skull and cross bones drawn on the tape.   You really need to get rid of that plastic measuring cup it’s so 2010  :-) 

  • JERMM

    Excellent tip Brian!  I keep a patch of HOT PINK duct tape on my bottle with skull and cross bones drawn on the tape.   You really need to get rid of that plastic measuring cup it’s so 2010  :-) 

    http://jjmatheshikes.blogspot.com/2011/03/how-do-you-measure-your-alcohol.html

  • gtosam

    The white squares in your pictures are very distracting.  They began appearing after your Mountain hike.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Actually no, I have been using them for months now. The majority of feedback that I get is that people love them, you’re the first negative feedback that I have received, but I appreciate you letting me know that they are a distraction. I’ll probably use them more sparingly going forward – promise!

      • Adam

        If these are the same things as the white circles that appear on mouse-over with information, I’ll vote some positive feedback here…

        • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

          Adam, yes that’s what those are. I think they add value but willing to hear what others have to say. Thanks for the first official thumbs up!

  • gtosam

    The white squares in your pictures are very distracting.  They began appearing after your Mountain hike.

  • Hhdese

    IE8 here – layout is messed up – picture footers mixed through the text.  Interestingly, denatured alcohol sold here in Belgium has already blue coloring in it. 

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      People still use IE to browse, who knew? I haven’t seen that issue with IE7,8 or 9 but I’ll take a look. If you can send me a screenshot of what you are seeing that will help me out tremendously!

  • Hhdese

    IE8 here – layout is messed up – picture footers mixed through the text.  Interestingly, denatured alcohol sold here in Belgium has already blue coloring in it. 

  • Rcr4624

    In the usa coloring all denatured alcohol would be considered a government intrusion on your right to be poisoned

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Too funny, sadly very true!

      • Aaron Veek

        BUT they are willing to color kerosene red so that truck drivers can’t get away with running it instead of diesel…

  • Rcr4624

    In the usa coloring all denatured alcohol would be considered a government intrusion on your right to be poisoned

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    People still use IE to browse, who knew? I haven’t seen that issue with IE7,8 or 9 but I’ll take a look. If you can send me a screenshot of what you are seeing that will help me out tremendously!

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Too funny, sadly very true!

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Actually no, I have been using them for months now. The majority of feedback that I get is that people love them, you’re the first negative feedback that I have received, but I appreciate you letting me know that they are a distraction. I’ll probably use them more sparingly going forward – promise!

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    It’s a prototype variation of the new Flatcat stove made for use with cups like Snow Peaks. I am testing it for the manufacturer  at the moment so I’m not at liberty to say much more at this point – expect a post all about it in near future! Wicked little stove BTW :-)

  • http://listeningtothewinds.blogspot.com/ Brad Neal

    Nice, would be nice to do that myself… never attempted to test stuff for other people though

  • Adam

    If these are the same things as the white circles that appear on mouse-over with information, I’ll vote some positive feedback here…

  • Adam

    I’m not sure if its all meths (denatured alcohol) in nz, but I’ve bought purple stuff. I assume that the small amount of food colouring would result in no noticeable soot or smoke. I guess you don’t add salts to your fuel to fix the colourless problem because of the corrosion problem?
     

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      If it’s the purple stuff I’m pretty sure its the same as meths from the UK. There’s been no noticeable soot or smoke as a result of adding the coloring that I have experienced, it’s such a negligible amount I can’t imagine it making much of a difference.

      I’ve never heard of adding salts to fule or of a corrosion problem. Can you give any more details?

      • KevinB

        About.com has a page about coloring flames. Not sure how it would affect your pot though.

        • KevinB

          Shortly after I posted this, I noticed this warning:

          “Don’t color BBQ fire! The colorants may produce pretty flames, but they can also produce toxic food.”

          I wouldn’t try it in your fuel, but a campfire might be fun.

  • Adam

    I’m not sure if its all meths (denatured alcohol) in nz, but I’ve bought purple stuff. I assume that the small amount of food colouring would result in no noticeable soot or smoke.
    I guess you don’t add salts to your fuel to fix the colourless problem because of the corrosion problem?
     

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Adam, yes that’s what those are. I think they add value but willing to hear what others have to say. Thanks for the first official thumbs up!

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    It’s something I thoroughly enjoy. It takes more time than you would think to do a really detailed test of a product, make sure you are using it in the intended way, in the right environment, take accurate notes, shoot photos and write up the blog post or feedback email (I don’t blog all the equipment I test, about 50/50).

    I get a kick out of seeing the feedback and suggestions I provide be rolled into improvements in the final product, that’s pretty cool to me.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    If it’s the purple stuff I’m pretty sure its the same as meths from the UK. There’s been no noticeable soot or smoke as a result of adding the coloring that I have experienced, it’s such a negligible amount I can’t imagine it making much of a difference.

    I’ve never heard of adding salts to fule or of a corrosion problem. Can you give any more details?

  • http://sticksblog.com/ Chad “Stick” Poindexter

    Thanks for the tip. That will be one that I will be sure to incorporate just because it looks cool…  :)  On my larger size 16 oz soda bottle fuel bottles I have printed off the ole skull and cross bones and have it wrapped around the bottle just as a soda label is, big and cannot be missed. The smaller 4 & 8 oz fuel bottles are not labeled because they are more obviously not to be drank from. But, after this, I may print some more skull & crossbones labels and adhere them to the smaller bottles too… Thanks for the post!

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Stick, better safe than sorry I guess. Big stickers are perfect, I just use the coloring as a quick visual reminder that this is not water :-)

  • http://sticksblog.com/ Chad "Stick" Poindexter

    Thanks for the tip. That will be one that I will be sure to incorporate just because it looks cool…  :)  On my larger size 16 oz soda bottle fuel bottles I have printed off the ole skull and cross bones and have it wrapped around the bottle just as a soda label is, big and cannot be missed. The smaller 4 & 8 oz fuel bottles are not labeled because they are more obviously not to be drank from. But, after this, I may print some more skull & crossbones labels and adhere them to the smaller bottles too… Thanks for the post!

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Stick, better safe than sorry I guess. Big stickers are perfect, I just use the coloring as a quick visual reminder that this is not water :-)

  • KevinB

    About.com has a page about coloring flames. Not sure how it would affect your pot though.

    http://chemistry.about.com/cs/howtos/a/aa052703a.htm

  • KevinB

    Shortly after I posted this, I noticed this warning:

    “Don’t color BBQ fire! The colorants may produce pretty flames, but they can also produce toxic food.”

    I wouldn’t try it in your fuel, but a campfire might be fun.

  • http://www.prepplace.blogspot.com badvoodoodaddy

    Excellent idea.  I like that you can really tell which is alcohol and not just water.  I am going to have to try this out the next time I go out.  I try labeling mine but sharpie and other inks just wash off when you get some alcohol on the outside of the bottle.  Very good post.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Thanks Jeff, proof that it doesn’t have to be complicated to be good!

  • http://www.lightAddict.net Fils

    very good tips ! thank you for sharing !

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Thanks Jeff, proof that it doesn’t have to be complicated to be good!

  • http://www.lightaddict.net/ Fils

    very good tips ! thank you for sharing !

  • http://www.prepplace.blogspot.com/ badvoodoodaddy

    Excellent idea.  I like that you can really tell which is alcohol and not just water.  I am going to have to try this out the next time I go out.  I try labeling mine but sharpie and other inks just wash off when you get some alcohol on the outside of the bottle.  Very good post.

  • Snctool

    Brian,

    Good safe idea. If you want to see the flame of your denatured alcohol burning in bright daylight…add a pinch of salt to your bottle and shake…voila…a yellow flame visible.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Wow! I haven’t tried that. Does it impact the efficiency of the burn?

      • Adam

        I’ve only used boric acid to turn meths flames green, but it only takes a bit. You should try the salt out in a stove you don’t mind damaging to test the efficiency. I think there’s a good chance you’ll have corrosion problems though. Salt is not good for metals.
        Definitely try it though.

  • Adam

    I’ve only used boric acid to turn meths flames green, but it only takes a bit. You should try the salt out in a stove you don’t mind damaging to test the efficiency. I think there’s a good chance you’ll have corrosion problems though. Salt is not good for metals.
    Definitely try it though.

  • Aaron Veek

    BUT they are willing to color kerosene red so that truck drivers can’t get away with running it instead of diesel…

  • jmschroff

    I cleaned wax from inside of a 6 gallon wine jug with denatured alcohol. How do I remove the terrible odor from inside the jug?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Do you mean the smell of the denatured alcohol? You could always try peeing in the jug :-)

      Anyone else have any better suggestions?

  • jmschroff

    I cleaned wax from inside of a 6 gallon wine jug with denatured alcohol. How do I remove the terrible odor from inside the jug?

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Do you mean the smell of the denatured alcohol? You could always try peeing in the jug :-)

    Anyone else have any better suggestions?

  • Mark Ball

    Great idea.  i have always marked fuel with a black marker.  Denatured alcohol can clean the marker right off the bottle.  Food coloring works.

  • Mark Ball

    Great idea.  i have always marked fuel with a black marker.  Denatured alcohol can clean the marker right off the bottle.  Food coloring works.

  • Mstee9

    i checked on instructables about the salt… seems to be commonly done… also found instructions for “salting out” isopropyl alcohol to get better flamability.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I’ve read about the salt options, but I have not actually tried it. Did you test it out?

      • Brian Kilduff

        I use a pinch of salt with my fuel to increase visibility, you still need to be cautious as its not a dramatic change in flame. I’ve not tested for a change in efficiency but have not noticed any. Definitely good if you are not on your own as it makes it far less likely for a fellow hiker to grill thier digits…

        • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

          Thanks Brian. I doubt that such a small amount of salt will have an noticeable impact on the performance of the stove especially compared to other factors such and outside temp and wind.

          Question: Do you add a pinch of salt to the alcohol in the bottle so that it’s pre-mixed and good to go or at the time of use? I assume the former.

          On a side note, my trick *only* protects from accidental drinking of the alcohol by coloring it. It does nothing for making the flame more visible when burning. Those are two very different but equally important issues of using an alcohol stove.

          Thanks for sharing, I might do some testing of this myself.

  • Mstee9

    i checked on instructables about the salt… seems to be commonly done… also found instructions for “salting out” isopropyl alcohol to get better flamability.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    I’ve read about the salt options, but I have not actually tried it. Did you test it out?

  • Karla from CO

    Adding Green coloring is a great idea!  (…good thing your name’s not white! :D)

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Ha! I try to show others the benefits of being ‘Green’ as much as I can =)

  • Karla from CO

    Adding Green coloring is a great idea!  (…good thing your name’s not white! :D)

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Ha! I try to show others the benefits of being ‘Green’ as much as I can =)

  • jon

    Great idea on adding salt …. I’ll have to try it’

    I never put my denatured alcohol in a bottle shaped like a drinking bottle (coke, gaterade, etc) due to the risk of someone mistaking the shape for a water bottle in the middle of the night.
    I use either the triangle shaped cough syrup bottle or the oval shaped mouth wash bottles. They are tougher and just by feel in the middle of the night in the tent I know I do not have my hands on water.

  • jon

    Great idea on adding salt …. I’ll have to try it’

    I never put my denatured alcohol in a bottle shaped like a drinking bottle (coke, gaterade, etc) due to the risk of someone mistaking the shape for a water bottle in the middle of the night.
    I use either the triangle shaped cough syrup bottle or the oval shaped mouth wash bottles. They are tougher and just by feel in the middle of the night in the tent I know I do not have my hands on water.

  • http://twitter.com/dtxe Simeon

    Not sure if it’d reduce the burning efficiency of the fuel (or cause toxic fumes), but adding a bit of metal would colour the flame. Copper sulfide/Copper chloride burns green. They use copper/magnesium/other metals in fireworks to colour them.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I’ve heard others suggest this too, can’t comment on the safety aspect as I’m not expert, but the technique and result seem feasible. Has anyone tried this?

      • http://www.facebook.com/steven.w.wilgus Steven W. Wilgus

        as a Registered Nurse, a Certified Respiratory Therapist, a Firefighter III w/ Haz-Mat: do NOT add metalic salts to cooking fuels: you create a GAS or an AEROSOL of material. The LONG TERM effects would be hard to take, as metalic poisoning almost always damages [often permanently] KIDNEYS/LIVER/NERVES. In the lungs, the issue can be an immediate problem if enough is breathed in a short time – and if an asthmatic, lethal. While pretty, I with the STRONGEST language possible without dramatics, recommend NOT to do it. And if it turns out I am wrong??? Then you are safe. If it turns out that I am right? You are safe.

  • http://twitter.com/dtxe Simeon

    Not sure if it’d reduce the burning efficiency of the fuel (or cause toxic fumes), but adding a bit of metal would colour the flame. Copper sulfide/Copper chloride burns green. They use copper/magnesium/other metals in fireworks to colour them.

  • http://twitter.com/davidspassage David’s Passage

    I’m a little leery of this method to be honest. Won’t this eventually gum up your stove? Why not just put the alcohol in a clearly marked container?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      It’s not so that I can see it in the container, that’s easy. It’s so that I can see it in the stove when I’m pouring it in bright daylight on the trail and so that I don’t spill it without knowing and accidentally catch my sleeve on fire.

      I’ll tell you that after using this method for a very long time now it has no noticeable impact on my stove and one simple rinse in warm water removed all of the coloring residue. It gums up my stove about as much as hydration tablets gum up a bladder – it doesn’t happen in my experience. If you do have problems with it please let me know.

  • http://twitter.com/davidspassage David’s Passage

    I’m a little leery of this method to be honest. Won’t this eventually gum up your stove? Why not just put the alcohol in a clearly marked container?

  • http://jimmypautz.com Jimmy Pautz

    Wouldn’t that make it sooty?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I don’t think adding salt to the alcohol would make it sooty enough to worry about, or sooty at all. I’ll have to try it and report back.

      • http://jimmypautz.com Jimmy Pautz

        I suppose that makes sense. Whenever I think of yellow flame, it usually is that the fuel is inefficient or with my big coleman dual fuel, there is too much air in the line. But using a chemical additive (salt) shouldn’t have the same effect.

  • http://jimmypautz.com/ Jimmy Pautz

    Wouldn’t that make it sooty?

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    I don’t think adding salt to the alcohol would make it sooty enough to worry about, or sooty at all. I’ll have to try it and report back.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    It’s not so that I can see it in the container, that’s easy. It’s so that I can see it in the stove when I’m pouring it in bright daylight on the trail and so that I don’t spill it without knowing and accidentally catch my sleeve on fire.

    I’ll tell you that after using this method for a very long time now it has no noticeable impact on my stove and one simple rinse in warm water removed all of the coloring residue. It gums up my stove about as much as hydration tablets gum up a bladder – it doesn’t happen in my experience. If you do have problems with it please let me know.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    I’ve heard others suggest this too, can’t comment on the safety aspect as I’m not expert, but the technique and result seem feasible. Has anyone tried this?

  • http://jimmypautz.com/ Jimmy Pautz

    I suppose that makes sense. Whenever I think of yellow flame, it usually is that the fuel is inefficient or with my big coleman dual fuel, there is too much air in the line. But use a chemical additive (salt) shouldn’t have the same effect.

  • Alexis

    Hmmm good idea, but can’t you just use gasoline?

  • Alexis

    Hmmm good idea, but can’t you just use gasoline?

  • DavoColo

    Great post. Being able to see the alcohol in my alcohol stove is very helpful.

    BTW, in parts of Africa and Asia — where rural people aren’t necessarily versed in the finer points of fuel chemistry — non-drinkable alcohol is dyed (usually blue, rather than green), as a safety precaution. I’ve used it for extended periods and the dye seem to have no effect whatsoever on stove or pots.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Right, in the UK methylated spirits is dyed pink/purple for the same reason – so it’s not mistakenly consumed. I wonder what they use to dye it blue?

  • DavoColo

    Great post. Being able to see the alcohol in my alcohol stove is very helpful.

    BTW, in parts of Africa and Asia — where rural people aren’t necessarily versed in the finer points of fuel chemistry — non-drinkable alcohol is dyed (usually blue, rather than green), as a safety precaution. I’ve used it for extended periods and the dye seem to have no effect whatsoever on stove or pots.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Right, in the UK methylated spirits is dyed pink/purple for the same reason – so it’s not mistakenly consumed. I wonder what they use to dye it blue?

  • http://www.facebook.com/steven.w.wilgus Steven W. Wilgus

    as a Registered Nurse, a Certified Respiratory Therapist, a Firefighter III w/ Haz-Mat: do NOT add metalic salts to cooking fuels: you create a GAS or an AEROSOL of material. The LONG TERM effects would be hard to take, as metalic poisoning almost always damages [often permanently] KIDNEYS/LIVER/NERVES. In the lungs, the issue can be an immediate problem if enough is breathed in a short time – and if an asthmatic, lethal. While pretty, I with the STRONGEST language possible without dramatics, recommend NOT to do it. And if it turns out I am wrong??? Then you are safe. If it turns out that I am right? You are safe.

  • Dave

    Great tip, I have worried about me or someone else accidently
    mistaking my alcohol for water. Using you tip I put a bit of brown paste type food
    coloring and the result is a nasty color that no one in their right mind would consider
    drinking. BTW to help make the flame visible add a bit of salt to your alcohol,
    it will add some yellow flames to the fire making it more visible. I read this
    on a few other sites, tried it and it works. Since apparently salt does not dissolve
    well in alcohol it should not be added to your bulk fuel container. I add it to
    my small container and shake it before dispensing, and that has worked well so
    far. It can leave a bit of salt residue in my stove so periodic rinsing might
    be a good idea.

    Thanks for the tip!

  • ben

    this almost happened to my brother, great idea

  • Anonymouse

    We were doing a chemistry experiment with denatured alcohol, and I decided to try this to make the flame more visible. We were using alcohol burners made from small glass jars (baby food) and cotton wicks. We did red, green, purple, and blue. Well, the blue exploded the cap off of the jar!

    We just so happened to use two different brands to make the two blue jars, and it happened to both of them (although much stronger reaction in one of them). The purple was a drop of one of the same blues with red, and it did NOT react.

    Anyone have any ideas why this occurred?

    • Anonymouse

      I meant to add that the blues were in 2 slightly different jars, but the rest of the jars matched up to Blue Jar #1.

  • http://www.campingstovecookout.com/ dave

    Thanks for the great tip. I am always trying to think about ways to make the trip safer especially now with a couple of young kids. Although I am not back on the trail yet with the 1 month old we hopefully will be back in the backcountry next summer.
    I will look forward to picking up many more tips from you between now and then.