Merrell Trail Glove – Barefoot Shoes

Merrell Trail Gloves

You may have seen my earlier post about the trouble I have been having trying to deal with shin splint pain. The comments that I received from that post were fantastic and I’d like to thank everyone who took the time to respond with advice on ways to deal with my pain.

I was particularly intrigued by several comments regarding my overall choice of shoes and running style, specifically that I was using the standard heel strike method of running with overly padded running shoes (Asics gel Nimbus 12). I was directed to some really informative online articles regarding the main causes of shin splint pain, barefoot running, and minimalistic footwear.

To cut a long story short, I read dozens of articles and watched numerous videos about the benefits of switching to a natural or barefoot running style and, thanks largely to Damien at ToeSalad.com, I was convinced that I should give it a try for myself. Nothing else that I had tried seemed to be reducing the pain of my shin splints so I figured what the heck. Here’s the comment on ToeSalad.com that sealed the deal for me:

“..the key is reducing loading rate and impact transient… it is not about the shoe, but about how you land. Barefoot running teaches the soft landing… then you can put the shoes on.” – Mark Cucuzzella MD.

With my mind made up, I ordered several popular styles of barefoot running shoes from Zappos.com, including the Vivobarefoot Neo Airmesh, Merrell True Gloves, and Merrell Trail Glove. I’m a Zappos VIP member so I was able to take advantage of free next day shipping.

The Vivobarefoot Neo Airmesh just didn’t fit my foot right at all. It was too narrow and the arch section was terribly uncomfortable. The Merrell True Gloves were also a very narrow fitting shoe, but the arch support was minimal and so I wore these around a little to get more used to them. After 30 minutes of casual wear my feet were complaining from the narrow fit. I decided to try the Merrell Trail Gloves the next day to allow my feet some time to recover.

The Merrell Trail Gloves seemed to be the shoe for me, at least out of the three styles I had tried. They were a much wider fit and a softer overall shoe than both the Vivos and the True Gloves.

Merrell Trail Gloves

The Trail Gloves have a very broad (wide) toe box section unlike the other two shoes. Remember, I’m almost entirely flat footed so my feet tend to need a wider shoe as they flatten out under pressure. There is a small amount of arch support in the Trail gloves, but not enough to cause pain or discomfort which a lot of shoe do for me. The arch support is more like a different density than true support, but it’s noticeable.

The mesh uppers breathe extremely well. The material used appears fragile but I was pleasantly surprised by how tough it was during a short run through some low brush. I haven’t experienced any “sweaty feet” issue so far with the Trail Gloves.

There is a good amount of toe protection rubber on the Trail gloves compared to the other two shoes. I bought these with the intent of road or flat surface running, but after wearing them for a few weeks it’s good to know that if I wanted to I could actually wear them on the trail without dmaging my toes or feet – good job on that Merrell.

You’ll see in the photo below that there is an impressive amount of traction and tread on the bottom of the Trail Gloves. The genuine Vibram rubber sole is incredibly flexible yet it has some pretty aggressive tread that reminds me of Pirelli sports car tires. One advantage of the thinner, more flexible rubber sole is that you are much more aware of the surface of the ground that you are on. You don’t feel every little bump, but you certainly do feel a lot more than regular x-runners.

Merrell Trail Gloves

The lacing system on the Trail Gloves is very clever. I often have issues with trying to tighten up laces because of the width of my feet. This was particularly difficult in the Merrell True Gloves despite them having a similar lacing system to the Trail Glove version. It seems Merrell got it right (for my feet at least) with the Trail Gloves. The laces are looped through a series of tabs that draw the shoe upper together in a very comfortable fit around the upper foot. The Trail Gloves were one of the first shoes I have work in a long time to not aggravate my instep.

Overall I am very pleased with my move to a zero drop running shoe. Since switching shoes and retraining my running style to a natural (barefoot) running technique using a forefoot strike, I have resolved my shin splint issue. If there were no other benefits of this change than the reduction in shin splint pain I would be extremely happy. However, I’ve seen an marked improvement in my pace and endurance, some of which I can attribute to the shoes but a lot of which is from the change in running technique – forefoot vs heel strike.

I have not experienced any issues with hot spots or blisters with the Trail Gloves which is normally par for the course with new shoes for me. I didn’t have to go through any breaking in period. I did notice that the shoes that fitted me best were a half size larger than my normal shoe size. I don’t know if that is a trait of these particular shoes, I know a lot of shoes can run small or large – Inov-8 seem to always be much smaller than stated – but being able to order several pairs at different sizes via Zappos really made it easy for me.

My transition to a natural running form and switch to barefoot shoes is ongoing. I’m impressed with the difference it has made with my running issues in just a few short weeks. I’ll write some updates as time goes on and my experience continues, but so far I’m a total convert to the barefoot style. Next I’d like to try a pair of Vibram 5Fingers – we’ll see.

Have you transitioned to a barefoot shoe or thought about doing it?

Disclosure: The author owns this product and paid for it using their own funds.

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  • Andrew Downie

    Nice post Brian.  Just out of curiosity, how come you didn’t try the Vibram Fivefingers?  I am a huge fan of mine (but have been considering the Merrells as well)…

    Good luck with the transition though, my calves hated me and they will again when I get back onto the wagon.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Andrew it’s simple. The Merrell’s look like a regular running shoe, well much more than the Vibram Fivefingers do. I love the idea of the VFFs, have read great things about them, and spoken to friends that swear by them – I’m just not comfortable with the way they look. Silly I guess but there it is.

      I’m interested in trying a pair of VFFs in the near future, but can’t quite afford any new shoes and want to give my Trail Gloves the time they deserve before trying anything new.

      I’m a size 9.5 if anyone has any VFFs that they don’t want :-)

  • http://www.outsideways.com/ Damien @ Outsideways

    Great article Brian! I am glad to hear that things are working out well for you so far. I am looking forward to seeing how things go over the long term. Are you going to try backpacking in them?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Damien, I’m on the fence about wearing them for backpacking, not because of the comfort but because I don’t want to rip the mesh upper and ruin these awesome shoes. I’m a little over-protective of my new found beauties. In time I’m sure I will be less concerned and do intend to go backpacking with them at some point. They are called TRAIL Gloves for a reason after all.

  • http://www.southwestgerberknives.com Gerber Knives |Dude

    Seems like such a great idea and the fact that you don’t get blisters is the best part for me.

    Plus no break in period. All i can say is wow.
    I’m getting some of these.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1847169238 Ken Jones

    Glad you got your issues straightened out.

    I concur with that doctor’s assessment.  I still run outside with regular running shoes.  I learned to land softly barefoot and in VFF on the treadmill.  Too much of the terrain I run in is hazardous without decent protection.  The wear pattern on my running shoes show nearly no wear on the heels and what is there is only from the warm up and cool down walks.

    Thanks for the update!

  • http://twitter.com/makaiscom Makais.com

    I recently purchased a pair of Merrell Moab Ventilator shoes. I have not taken them off since I got them! They are awesome, and my first experience with Merrell. After seeing this post, I’m thinking I might give these a try also.  :) todd

  • John Roan

    Brian,
    Nice post. I tried the Merrell Trail Gloves a while back and they rubbed me wrong, literally. The back of my achilles tendon started to blister in the first mile, so they immediately went back. Then I realized my favorite shoe manufacturer, Mizuno, makes a shoe that’s similar but not marketed as a barefoot shoe. The Wave Universe 3 is amazingly light (lighter than any other I have tried), and comfortable. They are a racing flat, but in my opinion fall into the category of a barefoot shoe. I’m sure there will be a post coming up on my site eventually. Thanks for the post!
    John

    • http://www.beuteltiere.org/ Basti Beuteltiere

      I had the same problems with my first pair of Trail Gloves. My achilles was rubbed so badly I had to send the shoes back. But one thing I learned by using different models by Merrell in the last few years is this: Not every pair of the same shoe modell fits the same! I had to go throu 3 different pairs of Trail Gloves (all the same size!) until I found one which wasn’t rubbing against my achilles and was comfy to wear!
      Now I’m quite happy with my pair of TGs but I’m already looking at some other shoes… (vivobarefoot)

      • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

        Yeah I’m loving mine for running, but just can’t envision wearing them for hiking or backpacking. They’re to minimal. It’s frustrating that there are discrepancies in shoes among the same sizes, but we’re now playing with such small tolerances that it’s bound to happen. Good to hear you found the right pair finally :-)

        Vivo’s don’t do much for me. I’m testing a couple of pairs of Altra shoes right now, the Lone Peaks (love them) and the Adams. Reviews coming soon…

  • rcMike

    It’s good to hear that you’re also making some progress with the Merrell Trail Glove.  I love mine so far.  I just returned from Yosemite where I used them on the dirt/paved trail from Happy Isles to the Vernal Falls bridge.  That was the first time that I did not wear socks with them and I got a small hot spot on the ball of my left foot.  Nothing major but still noticeable.  I was also carrying more weight than I normally do when hiking – I had two kids in my arms.  I definitely changed my footfalls when going downhill.  I used a midfoot/forefoot strike instead of a heel strike and was able to move faster without any stress on my knees.

    The Trail Glove provides a thicker sole than the Terra Plana Vivobarefoot shoes so it provides better protection from rocks.  It also has a more snug fit which keeps my forefoot from sliding around.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      rcMike, great photo of you carrying your kids. I can definitely say I’ve been in the same situation many times, thanks for sharing!

      I’m still wearing minimal socks with my Trail Gloves. Partly to avoid hot spots or blisters, and partly to help combat foot stink. I don’t want my new shoes getting all nasty too quickly :-)

      Also the socks that I have are the below the ankle “no-show” style but have extended tabs for the Achilles tendon so that the shoes don’t rub them.

  • Adrian

    Hi Brian – How much space should there be between the longest toe and the front of the shoe for these types of shoes like the Merrell Trail Glove?  Is it the same as a normal shoe (one finger’s widths)?

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Adrian, great question. I really didn’t measure my Trail Gloves any differently than I do for regular shoes. Unless anyone else can tell me differently or why that wouldn’t be the case, it makes sense to me.

    • http://www.outsideways.com/ Damien @ Outsideways

      Hello Adrian,

      I agree with Brian. I wouldn’t size them any different than you do your regular shoes. You still want a little space in front of the toes to prevent abrasion.

  • Adrian

    Hi Brian – How much space should there be between the longest toe and the front of the shoe for these types of shoes like the Merrell Trail Glove?  Is it the same as a normal shoe (one finger’s widths)?

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Adrian, great question. I really didn’t measure my Trail Gloves any differently than I do for regular shoes. Unless anyone else can tell me differently or why that wouldn’t be the case, it makes sense to me.

  • http://www.adventureinprogress.com/ Damien @ ADVENTUREinPROGRESS

    Hello Adrian,

    I agree with Brian. I wouldn’t size them any different than you do your regular shoes. You still want a little space in front of the toes to prevent abrasion.

  • Judy Wallace

    I’ve heard great things about these shoes from my husband!! Are you supposed to wear any socks with them? I was thinking about ordering some men’s quarter
    socks
    since they are low and won’t look strange when he runs in them, but I don’t want to sound dumb ordering them if you aren’t supposed to wear socks with these

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Evan-Lomas/100000279430614 Evan Lomas

    ive been dealing with flat feet lately, very helpful!

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Lately? You just got flat feet? Only kidding, if you fid something that works please consider sharing it here. I’m always looking for ways to combat flat feet. BTW – my two children (Maggie/5 Jack/7) both have totally flat feet – poor kids.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Evan-Lomas/100000279430614 Evan Lomas

        lol well ive had them forever, but when i started working alot more it became a huge problem. i tried buying some “custom” shoe insoles, but they really put pressure on my feet in a weird way. my solution? really didnt think there was much i could do on a day to day basis so when i begin to have my arch really start to hurt i put a piece of athlete tape on the bottom of my arch and pull it up towards the top of my arch, cheap great fit that costs alot less than most solutions. even cheaper than that blue tape stuff lol

        • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

          I’ve recently started increasing my workout routine too. I made the switch to a barefoot running style and shoe because of terrible shin splint pain and low arches. Withing a few days of gently making the transition to barefoot my shin splints had stopped. That was more progress in four days than I had seen with $$$ and high-end, padded running shoes in years – I’m a convert.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Evan-Lomas/100000279430614 Evan Lomas

    ive been dealing with flat feet lately, very helpful!

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Lately? You just got flat feet? Only kidding, if you fid something that works please consider sharing it here. I’m always looking for ways to combat flat feet. BTW – my two children (Maggie/5 Jack/7) both have totally flat feet – poor kids.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Evan-Lomas/100000279430614 Evan Lomas

    lol well ive had them forever, but when i started working alot more it became a huge problem. i tried buying some “custom” shoe insoles, but they really put pressure on my feet in a weird way. my solution? really didnt think there was much i could do on a day to day basis so when i begin to have my arch really start to hurt i put a piece of athlete tape on the bottom of my arch and pull it up towards the top of my arch, cheap great fit that costs alot less than most solutions. even cheaper than that blue tape stuff lol

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    I’ve recently started increasing my workout routine too. I made the switch to a barefoot running style and shoe because of terrible shin splint pain and low arches. Withing a few days of gently making the transition to barefoot my shin splints had stopped. That was more progress in four days than I had seen with $$$ and high-end, padded running shoes in years – I’m a convert.

  • http://twitter.com/makaiscom Makais.com

    I recently purchased a pair of Merrell Moab Ventilator shoes. I have not taken them off since I got them! They are awesome, and my first experience with Merrell. After seeing this post, I’m thinking I might give these a try also.  :) todd

  • John Roan

    Brian,
    Nice post. I tried the Merrell Trail Gloves a while back and they rubbed me wrong, literally. The back of my achilles tendon started to blister in the first mile, so they immediately went back. Then I realized my favorite shoe manufacturer, Mizuno, makes a shoe that’s similar but not marketed as a barefoot shoe. The Wave Universe 3 is amazingly light (lighter than any other I have tried), and comfortable. They are a racing flat, but in my opinion fall into the category of a barefoot shoe. I’m sure there will be a post coming up on my site eventually. Thanks for the post!
    John

  • http://sourceoutdoor.com/hydration-solutions/11-widepac.html Ben

    great post… i love the soles of these shoes… look very sturdy…im a sandal man myself

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    rcMike, great photo of you carrying your kids. I can definitely say I’ve been in the same situation many times, thanks for sharing!

    I’m still wearing minimal socks with my Trail Gloves. Partly to avoid hot spots or blisters, and partly to help combat foot stink. I don’t want my new shoes getting all nasty too quickly :-)

    Also the socks that I have are the below the ankle “no-show” style but have extended tabs for the Achilles tendon so that the shoes don’t rub them.

  • rcMike

    It’s good to hear that you’re also making some progress with the Merrell Trail Glove.  I love mine so far.  I just returned from Yosemite where I used them on the dirt/paved trail from Happy Isles to the Vernal Falls bridge.  That was the first time that I did not wear socks with them and I got a small hot spot on the ball of my left foot.  Nothing major but still noticeable.  I was also carrying more weight than I normally do when hiking – I had two kids in my arms.  I definitely changed my footfalls when going downhill.  I used a midfoot/forefoot strike instead of a heel strike and was able to move faster without any stress on my knees.

    The Trail Glove provides a thicker sole than the Terra Plana Vivobarefoot shoes so it provides better protection from rocks.  It also has a more snug fit which keeps my forefoot from sliding around.

  • Ryan

    Hey, I’m looking at buying the Trail Gloves and also have really wide feet.  I was wondering if the arch of the shoe has sort of relaxed or ‘given’ at all since you’ve been wearing it.  I tried on a pair, and it doesn’t bother me terribly, but I’m concerned about longer runs and stuff.  I heard that the EVA in that area will relax over time and won’t be as bad.  Any thoughts?  I appreciate any help.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Hey Ryan, there really isn’t very much “arch” support at all (if any) in the Trail Gloves, that’s why I liked them. I’ve been doing runs of 3-7 miles with no problems at all – other than calf cramps!

      I can’t say that I’ve noticed any change in the EVA material or a relaxing of the shoe, it was almost totally flat when I got them and still is with close to 100 miles on them now. If you’re at all in doubt I would recommend buying them through Zappos.com, their return policy is exceptional.

      If you decide to give them a try, let me know what you think and how it goes.

      • Ryan

        Awesome!  So you don’t feel the instep region pushing on the arch of your foot at all?  I’m pretty sure I’ll be getting a pair soon.  And I like this site a lot.  It’s been too long since I’ve had the time to go on a real backpacking trip.

        Thanks again for the info.

        • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

          That’s right, no raised arch at all for me. So far they’re close to exactly what I wanted.

  • http://www.beuteltiere.org/ Basti Beuteltiere

    I had the same problems with my first pair of Trail Gloves. My achilles was rubbed so badly I had to send the shoes back. But one thing I learned by using different models by Merrell in the last few years is this: Not every pair of the same shoe modell fits the same! I had to go throu 3 different pairs of Trail Gloves (all the same size!) until I found one which wasn’t rubbing against my achilles and was comfy to wear!
    Now I’m quite happy with my pair of TGs but I’m already looking at some other shoes… (vivobarefoot)

  • http://www.beuteltiere.org/ Basti Beuteltiere

    Thanks for this review!
    I do own a pair of Trail Gloves myself and these are my everyday shoes by now. The sole already got a lot softer/ flexible after a while which increased the comfort even more.
    One thing I discovered lately is that the grip of the soles isn’t the best on wet ground. When it’s raining they are indeed very slippery! Much more than other shoes I have worn recently (Nike Free, INOV8, etc.). I’m not speaking of trails. I’m speaking of normal streets and asphalt! So be careful!
    I do like these shoes for running and as I said before for everyday use. Although a friend of mine uses his pair of Trail Gloves during ultralight trips in the Swiss Alps!!! I don’t consider these to be a hiking shoe for me. When I’m hiking I still prefer my INOV8 for their far superior grip!

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      I can’t wear the Trail Gloves for hiking or backpacking either. Despite the claims that they strengthen your feet, I find that the uneven surfaces of a trail cause me too much pain and discomfort. I’m flat footed so already I’m at a disadvantage!

      I love the Innov-8 shoes, but wish they would make a wider more natural toe box. Until they do that I’m sworn off them even though they are one of my favorites.

  • http://www.beuteltiere.org/ Basti Beuteltiere

    Thanks for this review!
    I do own a pair of Trail Gloves myself and these are my everyday shoes by now. The sole already got a lot softer/ flexible after a while which increased the comfort even more.
    One thing I discovered lately is that the grip of the soles isn’t the best on wet ground. When it’s raining they are indeed very slippery! Much more than other shoes I have worn recently (Nike Free, INOV8, etc.). I’m not speaking of trails. I’m speaking of normal streets and asphalt! So be careful!
    I do like these shoes for running and as I said before for everyday use. Although a friend of mine uses his pair of Trail Gloves during ultralight trips in the Swiss Alps!!! I don’t consider these to be a hiking shoe for me. When I’m hiking I still prefer my INOV8 for their far superior grip!

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Yeah I’m loving mine for running, but just can’t envision wearing them for hiking or backpacking. They’re to minimal. It’s frustrating that there are discrepancies in shoes among the same sizes, but we’re now playing with such small tolerances that it’s bound to happen. Good to hear you found the right pair finally :-)

    Vivo’s don’t do much for me. I’m testing a couple of pairs of Altra shoes right now, the Lone Peaks (love them) and the Adams. Reviews coming soon…

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    I can’t wear the Trail Gloves for hiking or backpacking either. Despite the claims that they strengthen your feet, I find that the uneven surfaces of a trail cause me too much pain and discomfort. I’m flat footed so already I’m at a disadvantage!

    I love the Innov-8 shoes, but wish they would make a wider more natural toe box. Until they do that I’m sworn off them even though they are one of my favorites.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Hey Ryan, there really isn’t very much “arch” support at all (if any) in the Trail Gloves, that’s why I liked them. I’ve been doing runs of 3-7 miles with no problems at all – other than calf cramps!

    I can’t say that I’ve noticed any change in the EVA material or a relaxing of the shoe, it was almost totally flat when I got them and still is with close to 100 miles on them now. If you’re at all in doubt I would recommend buying them through Zappos.com, their return policy is exceptional.

    If you decide to give them a try, let me know what you think and how it goes.

  • Ryan

    Hey, I’m looking at buying the Trail Gloves and also have really wide feet.  I was wondering if the arch of the shoe has sort of relaxed or ‘given’ at all since you’ve been wearing it.  I tried on a pair, and it doesn’t bother me terribly, but I’m concerned about longer runs and stuff.  I heard that the EVA in that area will relax over time and won’t be as bad.  Any thoughts?  I appreciate any help.

  • Danielle

    Hi Brain,
    Thank you for the review.  I’ve suffering for a year because my low arch feet. (I just found out that I am almost flat feet last year, ha) I am not much a hiker because I fall down and twist my ankles almost everyday even on the flat ground.  I usually wear tennis shoes for walking, but lately I am feeling so much pain.  I’ve tried dr.scholls $50 insoles for a month, but I don’t feel much improvement on my condition.  Do you recommend the Trail Glove for walking and standing? 
    Thank you so much for helping.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Danielle, I don’t know if the Trail Gloves will do much or anything to improve your flat feet quickly, they have little to no arch support. What they will hopefully do over time is to strengthen the muscles in your feet which will help reduce the pain.

      My friend Damien Tougas runs the ToeSalad.com website which is dedicated to minimalist and barefoot style footwear, that would be the best place to post this type of question to get even more feedback. I’ll try and get Damien to chime in to this post if I can.

      • Danielle Lu

        Thank you so much for the information.  I’ll look into Damien’s website.  :)

        I also have problem on twisting my ankles frequently.  Do you have any suggestion on that.  (My friend was kind of joking and told me to wear parachuter’s boots. I can see he has a point.)  

        Most flat feet + Twisting ankle, I might need to see a doctor in the end.  Thanks again for helping.

  • Danielle

    Hi Brain,
    Thank you for the review.  I’ve suffering for a year because my low arch feet. (I just found out that I am almost flat feet last year, ha) I am not much a hiker because I fall down and twist my ankles almost everyday even on the flat ground.  I usually wear tennis shoes for walking, but lately I am feeling so much pain.  I’ve tried dr.scholls $50 insoles for a month, but I don’t feel much improvement on my condition.  Do you recommend the Trail Glove for walking and standing? 
    Thank you so much for helping.

  • http://www.briangreen.net/ Brian Green

    Danielle, I don’t know if the Trail Gloves will do much or anything to improve your flat feet quickly, they have little to no arch support. What they will hopefully do over time is to strengthen the muscles in your feet which will help reduce the pain.

    My friend Damien Tougas runs the ToeSalad.com website which is dedicated to minimalist and barefoot style footwear, that would be the best place to post this type of question to get even more feedback. I’ll try and get Damien to chime in to this post if I can.

  • Danielle Lu

    Thank you so much for the information.  I’ll look into Damien’s website.  :)

    I also have problem on twisting my ankles frequently.  Do you have any suggestion on that.  (My friend was kind of joking and told me to wear parachuter’s boots. I can see he has a point.)  

    Most flat feet + Twisting ankle, I might need to see a doctor in the end.  Thanks again for helping.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/08351210351424532419 Mylin

    I know I’m a little late compared to the other post but I’m really looking into the trail gloves due to my wide feet and no arches. I was wondering if your trail gloves were the wide width or did you get a regular pair of trail gloves?

  • Vickrhines

    I’ve used the Merrell Trail Gloves for 3 months now. I have never been happier with a pair of trail shoes. They WANT to run, so they do. As soon as they hit a trail. Flat feet, no problem. Wide toes, no problem. Previous shoes, Nike Free Trails with the heels ground off, Vibram 5-fingers. Both good, but no contest for me.

  • Vickrhines

    I’ve used the Merrell Trail Gloves for 3 months now. I have never been happier with a pair of trail shoes. They WANT to run, so they do. As soon as they hit a trail. Flat feet, no problem. Wide toes, no problem. Previous shoes, Nike Free Trails with the heels ground off, Vibram 5-fingers. Both good, but no contest for me.

  • James Darrel

    The case with me is slightly different. As I am one of those endowed with oversized feet, what is the view I should consider? Shall I try to get barefoot extra-large shoes for running or stick to the conventional logic? I recently bought wide toe boots from http://www.xlfeet.com. I am not sure whether they have developed oversized boots for bare foot running.

    • http://www.briangreen.net Brian Green

      Well you should probably start by thinking about which brand and style of barefoot shoes you would like to get if they were in your size. Then we can approach the manufacturer to see if they can accomodate your size. I’d be willing to help.

  • erin

    My husband has extremely flat wide feet. He used to walk all over his boots ,soles wore unevenly and they looked like a mess. He switched to merrell shoes ( as opposed to ” normal” shoes) for work because they were approved to work in at the airport and had been recommended. Neither of us realized until recently that they designed shoes for different foot types. Well i think the merrell trail glove shoes have helped relieve his foot pain and have improved his gait. His cowboy boots are wearing evenly now! Now, i am on th search for the shoe that will accomodate my severe bunions ( need surgery ..cant afford) and flat feet as well. I am so happy we stumbled onto these shoes.