Online Walking Time Calculator

Walking Calculator

I came across a really useful online walking time calculator during my daily reading and decided to share it with you all.  It’s pretty flexible and can even help you adjust your times to account for ascents (Naismith’s Rule) and fatigue (Tranter’s Corrections). Worth checking out and bookmarking!

Naismith’s Rule:
Is named after the Scottish climber W W Naismith, who devised the rule in 1892. The rule is very simple and easy to use, being based on an average walking peed of 3 miles per hour and an additional allowance of half an hour per 1,000 feet of ascent.

The basic rule often works very well for walks of up to about 4 hours in good conditions on good paths, although many people prefer to use a gentler pace of 2.5 miles per hour as the walking speed. The rule does not take into account the slowing effect of steep descents or the speeding up on gentle descents. These can be taken into account with the additional adjustments, but often these will more or less cancel each other out. More importantly, Naismith’s rule does not take into account fatigue during a walk, the load carried, difficult ground or bad weather.

Tranter’s Corrections:
These were designed to take fatigue and fitness into account, and consist of a table of adjustments for different fitness levels and different lengths of walk. To measure your fitness level, you should time an ascent of 1,000 feet in half a mile (300m in 800m). For the top fitness levels, the corrections reduce the time estimates for shorter walks by up to half, so be prepared for some jogging if you use those fitness levels on gentle walks! The corrections then progressively increase the time estimates for both increasing walk lengths and reducing fitness levels. By adjusting fitness levels, Tranter’s corrections can also be used to take into account bad weather or the conditions underfoot.

Do you know of any other useful online resources for backpacking and hiking?

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  • Nice, looks like this will be useful. Now if it only included photography and mushroom hunting I might never get back to the truck after dark again!

  • misterphil

    When I was younger, and had a little more spring in my step, I was in a mountain rescue team in the UK. We used Naismith and Trantor when planning routes back at base, but the rule of thumb that we used was: 5km/hr, +1 min for every contour line crossed in either ascent or descent (The UK ordnance survey maps have contours every 10m of altitude).

    Averaging it out however, it usually came out as being 3km/hr with packs when off the beaten track.

  • misterphil

    When I was younger, and had a little more spring in my step, I was in a mountain rescue team in the UK. We used Naismith and Trantor when planning routes back at base, but the rule of thumb that we used was: 5km/hr, +1 min for every contour line crossed in either ascent or descent (The UK ordnance survey maps have contours every 10m of altitude).

    Averaging it out however, it usually came out as being 3km/hr with packs when off the beaten track.