Evernew 2DX Titanium Pot Set

Evernew Titanium DX Pot Set

About a year and a half ago I bought my first set of titanium cooking pots, the Evernew 2DX Titanium cookset, with the intent of always taking them with me and using them as part of my primary cooking kit. My previous “go to” pot was the popular GSI Soloist which is both lightweight and very versatile.

However, along the way and shortly after investing in the Evernew DX pot set, I started enjoying cooking over a wood burning stove and open camp fire rather than using my Bud-Light alcohol stove. There were a combination of factors at play, the ease of finding fuel for wood burning, not needing to carry denatured alcohol, having a multi-use stove, or having a pot that required no stove and could be used over an open camp fire as a billy can.

Open Country 4 Quart Pot with Lid

I then snapped up a great deal at REI on an Open Country 4-quart pot which was perfectly suited for camp fire cooking and use on a wood burning stove. The long curving handle made it great for hanging above a fire like a billy can. It was very inexpensive and made from aluminum, so reasonably light weight ($10/16oz).

I was pretty content with the Open Country pot and considered it part of my updated trail cooking system, along with my Bud-Light stove and fuel I had what I thought was the best of all options – alcohol, wood, camp fire, all set right?

Ben's Backwoods Cook Kit

Nope! I bought the Ben’s Backwoods Cook Kit while I was on a bit of a billy can bender. If you recall I did a review of this entire set up and openly admitted that I LOVED it despite the incredible weight of the steel pot and stove. I still do love the Zebra billy can and Littlbug Jr. stove, but I discovered that what I was really attracted to was the ability to cook over a wood fire. Whether that was a wood burning stove or open camp fire didn’t really matter – I just liked it and it was a lot less finicky than any of my alcohol stoves (don’t hate me).

Littlbug Junior Wood Burning Stove

I mention all of this because my evolving cooking style and love of a wood burning stoves eventually lead me back to the Evernew titanium 2DX set that I had bought and neglected for so long. This was facilitated by yet another stove purchase (I should seek professional help), this time the Evernew titanium DX stove set. More about the DX stove in a later blog post.

Evernew DX Alcohol Stove Set unboxed

The tiny titanium DX stove set provided me with the ability to cook using an alcohol stove, Esbit fuel tabs, or as a very small and compact wood burning stove – and it was lightweight! Which then reminded me that I had a set of titanium pots somewhere that would be perfect to go with it. So I hunted around and dug out the unused Evernew Ti pot set to take a closer look.

Without intending to do so, I had paired up the two Evernew sets to arrive at a practical and highly versatile cooking system that appealed to my new found way of wood stove cooking. With this set up I could also switch to using Esbit fuel tabs or the alcohol stove depending on my needs and the fuel I had available. Eureka!

Evernew Titanium DX Pot Set

Taking a Closer Look
All this leads me back to the neglected Evernew 2DX titanium pot set that I bought so long ago. So I decided to take a much closer look at it and test it out a few times. I’ll go over some of the details and explain what I like and don’t like.

Evernew USA has a very comprehensive line up of titanium cookware. They have deep pots, shallow pots, stacking pots, non-stick and regular pots, pasta pots with strainer lids, mugs – the list is impressive. I knew I wanted a small’ish set with a non-stick coating so I chose the smallest of their titanium non-stick stacked pots (model: ECA417). The listed weight for this set on the Evernew website is 7.1oz. When I weighed it myself I found it to be well under that even if I included the stuff sack that the set came with.

  • Lid/Skillet – 2.625oz
  • Bottom Pot – 3.5oz
  • Stuff Sack – 0.5oz
  • Total Weight – 6.625oz

The overall size of the set is quite small, which may look deceptive in the photos. When the set is combined for packing it measures 5.35 inches in diameter and just a hair over 4 inches tall. It certainly doesn’t feel very big when you hold it.

Evernew 2DX Titanium Cookset

The bottom pot has a capacity of 30floz which is more than enough for my usual two cups (16oz) of water used for re-hydrating foods. It’s also wide enough and deep enough to use for cooking a more substantial meal instead of just boiling water. Now that I am able to use a wood burning stove and maintain the heat/fire for longer periods of time that i can with an alcohol stove, I’ve found that I enjoy making slightly more involved meal while on the trail. It’s nice to kick back and relax while taking a little more time to cook, even if it means continually having to feed a wood burning stove!

Evernew Titanium Pots - 1

One of the features I like about this particular set is the small pouring spout that is part of the lower pot. Not only does it make pouring hot liquids much easier, it serves as a very effective strainer when combined with the upper lid. I had hacked the lid of my Open County pot by drilling a row of small holes in it to works as a strainer, but the Evernew set does this perfectly, albeit more slowly – but it works!

The lower pot has very clear measurement markings on the inside directly opposite the handles where they are easy to see. Unfortunately they are in metric and only indicate the 300ml (10.1floz) and 600ml (20.3floz) levels, with 900ml (30.4floz) being the top of the pot. I would like to see both metric and imperial measurements on the pot and have a few more increments.

Evernew Titanium Pots - 2

For those of you, like me, that often need to boil just two cups (16oz) of water, you can aim for roughly in between the 300ml and 600ml markers which would be 450ml and pretty close to the actual 473ml that 16oz is equal to. I’ve found that using this estimation has worked very well because it is just under the actual two cup amount and prevent me from adding too much water to some of the meals, many of which are better with slightly less water anyway.

The folding handles are very nicely designed and implemented. They are not at all flimsy and snap into place when fully open. I’ve tested other similar pot designs with this style of handle and have found that they are often able to swing wildly around as you move the pot. The Evernew handles stay in place when open which is a small but really nice detail. Both sets of handles have a thick coating of heat-resistant silicon that provide good purchase as well as protection from heat transfer so you don’t burn your fingers.

Evernew DX Alcohol Stove Set

The walls of the pots are very thin, no doubt to save weight and cost. I mention that because I very nearly caved in the sides of the larger pot when I first used it. I was expecting it to be as robust as my GSI Soloist. I don’t see this as a fault or problem with the design or manufacture of these pots. It is more to do with my lack of familiarity with titanium pots in general and how delicate they are compared to pots made from other materials.

Of course the flip side of this is that the pot is light weight and extremely efficient at conducting heat. I like how responsive the pot is to heat because that allows me to take it on and off the heat or adjust my stove to suit my cooking needs. I haven’t done so yet, but I will most likely make a Reflectix pot cozy for this set so that it can retain the heat when it’s taken off the stove. Without a pot cozy of some kind the pot and contents cool down very quickly. Again, that’s not so much a criticism of the design, but more a consequence of the materials used.

Evernew Titanium Pot Boiling

Boil times were very good with this set. It took just under 5 mins to boil two cups of cold water using an alcohol stove and slightly less, 3.5 mins, using the wood burning stove configuration. Both of those times are with the upper pot/lid removed. Boil times were marginally better with the lid in place but not enough to be of great significance.

The upper pot or lid can be used as a small skillet or shallow pot. It is also non-stick coated but does not have any measurement markings. The product specs indicate that it has a maximum capacity of 500ml or 16.9floz. As it is so close to being almost perfectly two cups (16floz) I use it as a makeshift measure for my water and just make sure that I don’t fill it up all the way, which is actually very practical if you don’t want to spill water. The upper pot/skillet doesn’t have a pouring spout, so it is not as easy to pour as the bottom pot.

Summary
Overall I am really pleased with the quality and functionality of the Evernew 2DX cookset. I wish I had started using it a long time ago when I first bought it, but I’m glad I rediscovered it now. There are a few things that Evernew could do to improve the design like having both decimal and imperial markings and more increments, but that didn’t overly impact my usage of the pots. They’re compact, lightweight, and easy to clean with the non-stick finish. If you are considering investing in a set of titanium pots in the near future, I would definitely recommend that you consider this set in your product research.

I’ll be reporting back on this set after I have had more time with it and with the Evernew DX stove set. I will also being posting a review of the DX stove shortly. Do you use a titanium pot set? If so, what make and model do you use and why?

Disclosure: The author owns this product and paid for it using their own funds.

(Visited 1,450 times, 1 visits today)
Be Sociable, Share!
  • Brain –
    I’ve been using the DX Stove for about a year and loving it. I did a couple test on it if you are interested:

    DX burning Wood

    DX burning Alc

    Robin

  • Brain? I’ll take that as a compliment :) Robin, I’m always happy to post legitimate links and promote knowledge sharing. I think I had stumbled upon your posts recently, but great to have them linked back here. I’ll be putting the Evernew DX stove through its paces a little later, but so far it’s been great. Thanks for your feedback. How are you liking the DX stove so far?

  • I have a 2L MSR titanium pot and a 1L SnowPeak titanium pot that I use. I don’t think either one of them is still in production. I don’t like carrying wood burning stoves, so if I’m not useing my regular stove, I just put them directly on the coals. It’s been working out great so far.

    I agree that there is something special about cooking on a wood fire.

  • Brian- you’re a stovey… :^D

    It looks like you have a great cook kit, IMO it’s hard to beat Evernew for quality.

    I have the DX stove for wood only, I bought it for it’s compactness and it fit inside my mug. But, I haven’t had the best of results with it in wood mode, I suspect be the bottom of my mug a MLD 850 is too narrow to catch enough heat, maybe a wider surface is needed. I use the same mug with a Trail Design Caldera Ti-Tri UCL in wood mode with excellent results.

    I met a couple last summer both used the DX stove in wood mode, she would used alcohol with it and he would use Esbit, they loved it. Now that I’m thinking about it they both used an Evernew 0.6L pot.

  • Ross, I’d be happy to leave the stove at home and just cook over a camp fire, but a lot of places that I hike don’t allow you to have an open fire, so using the stove in wood mode is a nice option to have. I also like to practice LNT as much as possible, and the turbo base plate of the Evernew DX stove really helps in this regard by elevating the fire off the ground slightly, it also helps improve airflow. But I hear what you’re saying. So what is you “regular” stove, if I may ask?

    JERMM, guilt as charged! It must be the tinkerer in me, I like playing with stoves and making my own. I agree that a slightly wider base would benefit heat conduction when using the DX in wood mode, but I get a fairly decent boil time using my GSI soloist which is quite narrow too. More excuses to get out and practice with gear :-)

  • I have a 2L MSR titanium pot and a 1L SnowPeak titanium pot that I use. I don’t think either one of them is still in production. I don’t like carrying wood burning stoves, so if I’m not useing my regular stove, I just put them directly on the coals. It’s been working out great so far.

    I agree that there is something special about cooking on a wood fire.