UST JetScream Whistle

UST JetScream™ Whistle

I recently picked up a UST JetScream™ Whistle to see if all of the hype about how incredibly loud it is was actually true. I should note that I have some friends and fellow backpackers who scoff at me carrying a whistle with me when I hike and like to make lighthearted fun of it. I’ll be the first to admit that it’s probably the least sexy or technical piece of gear that I carry – but it is as important, if not more so, as any other piece of gear that I carry.  So, to my way of thinking I should put as much effort into selecting and testing a whistle as I do anything else, which appeals to my inner gear geek!

The JetScream measures 2.3 inches (5.8 cm) in length and weighs 0.3 oz (8.5g) – not including the cord.  It uses a compact “pea-less” design that works even when it’s wet and which allows it to fit easily into a pocket or lay flat against your chest if worn around your neck on a cord or lanyard.  The pea-less design also means it will not freeze up in cold weather or get jammed with debris.

UST JetScream™ Whistle

According to the literature that came with the whistle, the JetScream focuses air through two harmonically tuned air chambers (seen on the sides in the photo above) to produce an ear-piercing 122Db shriek that is audible over most other natural and man made noises.  In all of my outdoor testing the sound that was produced was nowhere near as loud as I had expected or hoped.  The sound the whistle makes is indeed shrill and somewhat ear-piercing, but it sounds more like a high-pitched hiss than a perfectly tuned whistle tone. It is hard to describe.  It is like the sound of air escaping under high pressure combined with a high pitched whistle, all at the same time. Maybe I have a slightly defective or misaligned example, but it is definitely not the “harmonically tuned” pure whistle sound that I was expecting.  Note: I do not have any audio equipment for accurately testing decibel levels.

My usual whistle is the ACR WW-3 Survival Whistle that was developed for the US Navy and is USCG approved. Like the JetScream it is also a flat, pea-less design.  It’s made from high impact plastic which means that it is very durable and rugged enough for extended backcountry use. It continues to be one of the loudest emergency whistles I have ever used, and easily audible from great distances thanks to the crisp ear-piercing sound. Even at 102Db (again, according to the literature) it sounds significantly more loud than the UST JetScream.

Oh yeah, did I also mention that it is lightweight? The ACR weighs a mere 0.125 oz (3.5 g) – that’s half the weight of the JetScream whistle and it measures 1 x 2 x .25 inches (2.5 x 5.0 x .6 cm).

WW-3 ACR Whistle

I’m disappointed in the performance and sound of the UST JetScream whistle and will most likely continue to carry my ACR.  I recently bought 5 more of the ACR whistles to make sure that I had enough for everyone in my family to carry one when we go on family hikes – it’s loud, light weight and very affordable.

Disclosure: The author owns this product and paid for it using their own funds.

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  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01151735037210471028 Steve

    I absolutely agree about the jetscream. It’s overrated.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/03273635149581112218 Tate

    if you pucker you lips and blow onto a stretched piece of plastic between your lips, it creates the loudest whistle i have ever heard- far louder and lighter than anything you can buy. however, it is kinda difficult to learn, i learned it in grade-school but have found it difficult to teach others. a thick candy wrapper such as from a jolly rancher works terrific.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/09628095804170935682 Brian

    Tate, would that be similar to the method of blowing on a blade of grass between your thumbs? I’d love to see a photo of you actually doing it :)